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Pathways to Industrialization in the Twenty-First CenturyNew Challenges and Emerging Paradigms$
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Adam Szirmai, Wim Naudé, and Ludovico Alcorta

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199667857

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199667857.001.0001

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Global Supply Chains in Chinese Industrialization: Impact on Waste Scavenging in Developing Countries

Global Supply Chains in Chinese Industrialization: Impact on Waste Scavenging in Developing Countries

Chapter:
(p.324) 12 Global Supply Chains in Chinese Industrialization: Impact on Waste Scavenging in Developing Countries
Source:
Pathways to Industrialization in the Twenty-First Century
Author(s):

Martin Medina

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199667857.003.0012

Recycling in developing countries relies on the activities carried out informally by scavengers or waste pickers. These activities have existed for centuries, supplying raw materials that industry recycles (Medina 2007). But over the past two decades, globalization has encouraged the development of global supply chains that link scavengers in many developing countries with industrial activities in China and India. These new supply chains have received scant attention from researchers. This chapter intends to fill some knowledge gaps about these supply chains. Over the past two decades China, and, to a lesser extent India, has undergone a remarkable economic transformation. This transformation has been spearheaded by industrialization. Industrial activities require a wide variety of inputs, such as energy, water, metals, plastics, wood, textiles, glass, and so on. China is an important global player in the international commodities markets, and a significant producer and consumer of commodities and other industrial inputs.

Keywords:   China, supply chains, developing countries, scavenging, recycling, globalization, industrialization

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