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Pathways to Industrialization in the Twenty-First CenturyNew Challenges and Emerging Paradigms$
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Adam Szirmai, Wim Naudé, and Ludovico Alcorta

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199667857

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199667857.001.0001

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Global Asymmetries and their Implications for Climate and Industrial Policies

Global Asymmetries and their Implications for Climate and Industrial Policies

Chapter:
(p.293) 11 Global Asymmetries and their Implications for Climate and Industrial Policies
Source:
Pathways to Industrialization in the Twenty-First Century
Author(s):

Thomas Gries

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199667857.003.0011

In today’s globalized world there is a complex relationship between economic activity and the environment. There is a feedback mechanism from the environment to economic activity and welfare. Besides the fact that economic development is a driving force for climate change, policies that aim to mitigate global warming may also impact negatively on the speed of global development processes. We demonstrate that there can be no solution for the problem of global warming on a global scale that does not account for the effects that climate policy has on economic development, especially for less developed countries. We observe major asymmetries and heterogeneities. This chapter seeks to highlight the main effects of global asymmetries on the efficiency of a global climate and industrial policy. Since economic theory is well developed with respect to environmental economics we can use the associated findings as a starting point for analysing the asymmetry issue.

Keywords:   climate change, environment, industrial policy, economic theory, economic development, developing countries

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