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Climate Change and the Moral AgentIndividual Duties in an Interdependent World$
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Elizabeth Cripps

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199665655

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199665655.001.0001

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Promotional and Direct Duties

Promotional and Direct Duties

Chapter:
(p.140) 6 Promotional and Direct Duties
Source:
Climate Change and the Moral Agent
Author(s):

Elizabeth Cripps

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199665655.003.0006

This chapter defends individual promotional duties as primary in cases of unfulfilled weakly collective duties. It appeals to efficiency, effectiveness and fairness, and responds to four objections. Direct duties are defended when it is impossible or unfeasibly costly to promote collective action, or if they are one way of fulfilling promotional duties. A derivative case is made for some mimicking actions, including emissions cuts, as necessary or efficient means of fulfilling promotional or direct duties. The limits of demandingness of individual duties are discussed, and two objections rejected, including a rejection of Murphy’s compliance condition. It is considered how what is demanded or expected can vary across individuals, depending on talents, circumstances, and social or institutional position.

Keywords:   climate change, promotional duties, direct duties, effectiveness, fairness, efficiency, demandingness, compliance condition

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