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Computational PhenotypesTowards an Evolutionary Developmental Biolinguistics$
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Sergio Balari and Guillermo Lorenzo

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199665464

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199665464.001.0001

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Computational Homology

Computational Homology

Chapter:
(p.89) 5 Computational Homology
Source:
Computational Phenotypes
Author(s):

Sergio Balari

Guillermo Lorenzo

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199665464.003.0005

This chapter justifies a “computational level” of biological analysis and present the concepts of “computational homology” and “computype,” which pave the way to their thesis that FL can be homologized with an extremely large natural class of “computational systems,” most probably extending to the whole family of vertebrates, no matter the behaviors these systems underlie and the benefits they provide in each particular case. The chapter also offers a detailed presentation of the architectural organization of the organ that the text identifies as the computational system, as well as a proposal concerning its anatomical basis, with a basic distinction between a sequencer/basal component and a working memory/cortical component.

Keywords:   homology, computation, formal languages, Chomsky hierarchy, basal ganglia, cortical memory networks, computational phenotypes

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