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Greek Fragments in Postmodern FramesRewriting Tragedy 1970-2005$
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Eleftheria Ioannidou

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780199664115

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199664115.001.0001

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Tragedy and Modern Critical Debate

Tragedy and Modern Critical Debate

Chapter:
(p.13) 1 Tragedy and Modern Critical Debate
Source:
Greek Fragments in Postmodern Frames
Author(s):

Eleftheria Ioannidou

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199664115.003.0002

The first chapter offers an overview of the twentieth-century critical debates on tragedy in the modern era, drawing on theorists from George Steiner and Walter Benjamin to Raymond Williams and Terry Eagleton. The theorists under examination have mainly questioned the possibility or relevance of tragedy in the modern world. The chapter demonstrates that the various readings and interpretations of tragedy across time are part of wider critical and political debates and utilizes the materialist analysis introduced by Williams—and adopted for the most part in Eagleton’s analysis—in order to challenge the recurring arguments that tragedy has no place in the modern or postmodern era.

Keywords:   Tragic theory, Walter Benjamin, George Steiner, Bertolt Brecht, Eric Bentley, Raymond Williams, Terry Eagleton, Friedrich Nietzsche, Dionysiac/Appoline, Trauerspiel

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