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Materiality and OrganizingSocial Interaction in a Technological World$
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Paul M. Leonardi, Bonnie A. Nardi, and Jannis Kallinikos

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199664054

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199664054.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 21 October 2019

Theorizing Information Technology as a Material Artifact in Information Systems Research

Theorizing Information Technology as a Material Artifact in Information Systems Research

Chapter:
(p.216) (p.217) 11 Theorizing Information Technology as a Material Artifact in Information Systems Research
Source:
Materiality and Organizing
Author(s):

Daniel Robey

Benoit Raymond

Chad Anderson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199664054.003.0011

Research that includes information technology (IT) artifacts within its scope of focus (e.g., “computer impact” studies) often fails to engage adequately with the material properties of those IT artifacts. The result is a limited theoretical account of the relationship between IT and organizations and individuals. This chapter seeks to address that issue by tracing the disappearance of materiality from the concept of technology in organization theory and offering suggestions for meeting the challenge of carefully defining materiality concepts for IT (e.g., affordances), adapting them to a sociomaterial context, and including them in established theories commonly used in information systems (IS) research (e.g., adaptive structuration theory, organizational routines theory, theory of work–life boundary management).

Keywords:   IT artifacts, materiality, organization theory, affordances, organizational routines

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