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Public Policy InvestmentPriority-Setting and Conditional Representation In British Statecraft$
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Anthony Bertelli and Peter John

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199663972

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199663972.001.0001

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Policy Prioritization

Policy Prioritization

Chapter:
(p.10) 2 Policy Prioritization
Source:
Public Policy Investment
Author(s):

Anthony M. Bertelli

Peter John

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199663972.003.0002

This chapter reviews extant accounts of public opinion responsiveness, party positioning, political business cycles, and endogenous agenda setting by parties and governments that have different assumptions about how policymakers process relevant signals from the external world. Empirical studies do not convincingly ascertain the direction of causation in the policy-opinion linkages, or generalize from weak results. An account of why political actors would see it in their interest to respond with increased attention to policy issues is not readily available from relevant literatures. It is not obvious that it should be in the incumbent’s interest always to respond to public signals of priority, nor is it clear that government should always intervene in a crisis. Even theories claiming that politicians will be motivated by ideology have difficulty explaining prioritization.

Keywords:   public opinion responsiveness, agenda setting, political business cycles, party positioning, endogenous agenda setting

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