Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Advancing the Human Right to Health$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

José M. Zuniga, Stephen P. Marks, and Lawrence O. Gostin

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199661619

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199661619.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 17 August 2019

Health development as nation strengthening

Health development as nation strengthening

Chapter:
(p.55) Chapter 4 Health development as nation strengthening
Source:
Advancing the Human Right to Health
Author(s):

Ariel Pablos-Mendéz

Lesley Stone

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199661619.003.0004

This chapter discusses economic development for health as a key driver of stronger, more productive States. Many States lack the capacity fully to ensure the conditions in which everyone can be healthy. To guarantee the right to health, it is not only necessary to hold States accountable, but also to provide them with the capacity to meet the needs of their populations. This requires both bilateral and multilateral assistance. It also requires changing the traditional paradigm of ‘donors’ and ‘recipients’, moving to the idea of mutual responsibilities. Higher-income States, and the international community as a whole, should partner with lower-income States to ensure a fair allocation of scarce resources. This requires not just adequate funding, but also ensures that States regain full ‘ownership’ of their national strategies, activities, and programmes.

Keywords:   economic development, public health, health policy, donors, recipients, resource allocation, mutual responsibilities

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .