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The Powers of Aristotle's Soul$
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Thomas Kjeller Johansen

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199658435

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199658435.001.0001

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The Matter of the Soul’s Activities

The Matter of the Soul’s Activities

Chapter:
(p.146) 8 The Matter of the Soul’s Activities
Source:
The Powers of Aristotle's Soul
Author(s):

Thomas Kjeller Johansen

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199658435.003.0009

Aristotle's account of affections ‘common to body and soul’ suggests that the formal account of a psychological affection implies a specific account of the bodily side of this affection. This is because the form as a final cause hypothetically necessitates certain material changes. DA II.5's account of perception does not contradict this diagnosis, since viewing perception as a fulfilment and a perfective alteration (in a manner derived from Phys. II.3) does not exclude this but leaves it open both that perception may involve material changes and what such changes might be. As a perfective alteration perception may involve material changes in other categories of change, or within the same category. The point is demonstrated by Aristotle's accounts of hearing, smell, and touch.

Keywords:   material change, hypothetical necessity, perfection, categories of change

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