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Blood of the ProvincesThe Roman Auxilia and the Making of Provincial Society from Augustus to the Severans$
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Ian Haynes

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199655342

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199655342.001.0001

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Military Service and the Urban Experience

Military Service and the Urban Experience

Chapter:
(p.144) (p.145) Chapter 10 Military Service and the Urban Experience
Source:
Blood of the Provinces
Author(s):

Ian Haynes

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199655342.003.0010

Auxiliaries were housed in very different bases across the Empire. Yet it is possible to offer a useful generalization about military life in all these settlements; it was an essentially urban experience. The soldier’s daily activities might differ from his fellow town-dwellers, his life might be ruled by the military clock rather than by other imperatives, but he was still essentially an urban creature. This chapter seeks to characterize more precisely the relationship of military life and city life, through the use of an extended case study of Dura-Europos on the Euphrates. While this site has a different form and history to many of its western counterparts, it nevertheless provided the auxiliaries stationed with it with certain similar experiences. In pursuing this theme, the chapter seeks to contribute to wider discussions on the role of urbanism in the incorporation of provincial society.

Keywords:   Dura-Europos, Mons Claudianus, Antioch, Vindolanda, principia, bath houses, barracks, Urbanism

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