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British Writers and Paris 1830–1875$
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Elisabeth Jay

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780199655243

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199655243.001.0001

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Regime change as viewed from English shores

Regime change as viewed from English shores

Chapter:
(p.33) 3 Regime change as viewed from English shores
Source:
British Writers and Paris 1830–1875
Author(s):

Elisabeth Jay

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199655243.003.0004

The texts discussed focus upon the significance British writers felt that the political events taking place in Paris between 1830 and 1875 had for the British political situation. Featuring many shades of political opinion, and changes of sympathy, they show how, for the British, these events confirmed Paris as the symbolic site of revolution or tyranny, and reveal the threat that the working classes posed in the English middle-class imagination. The chapter argues that the Commune and its bloody suppression supplanted images of the 1789 Revolution, and that subsequent representations of the Commune were much influenced by fears concerning the socialist movement in England. Arnold Bennett’s changed approach, by contrast, is marked by the sustained stability of France’s Third Republic.

Keywords:   British socialism, Commune, conservatives, radicals, 1789 Revolution, working classes

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