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British Writers and Paris 1830–1875$
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Elisabeth Jay

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780199655243

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199655243.001.0001

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Who were ‘the Paris correspondents’?

Who were ‘the Paris correspondents’?

Chapter:
(p.164) 9 Who were ‘the Paris correspondents’?
Source:
British Writers and Paris 1830–1875
Author(s):

Elisabeth Jay

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199655243.003.0010

This chapter argues that the value of such a taxonomy lies in revealing Paris as a significant catalyst in the process by which freelance reporters, often stumbling into journalism part-time, came to see it as a full-time profession, and in uncovering the creative friendships and tensions which would characterise the world of magazine and newspaper production in mid-nineteenth-century London. Typical early recruits came from those in Paris studying art or medicine; a long-established Irish colony augmented this number. Knowledge of the networks essential to news-gathering often secured second-generation journalists their Paris seat. The very varied male backgrounds dispute the significance of a university education as a bonding mechanism, while the evidence points to women journalists being less exceptional than usually claimed.

Keywords:   art, Irish, medicine, networks, part-time, professional, taxonomy, university, women

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