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The Emotional Power of MusicMultidisciplinary perspectives on musical arousal, expression, and social control$
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Tom Cochrane, Bernardino Fantini, and Klaus R. Scherer

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199654888

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199654888.001.0001

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“Mors stupebit”

“Mors stupebit”

multiple levels of fear-arousing mechanisms in Verdi’s Messa da Requiem

Chapter:
(p.146) (p.147) Chapter 11“Mors stupebit”
Source:
The Emotional Power of Music
Author(s):

Luca Zoppelli

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199654888.003.0011

There are many different mechanisms by which transmission of emotional states in music can occur. Some are based on the primary functions of music with respect to the construction of experience and the induction of kinaesthetic responses. Others manipulate and exploit the listener’s logical/syntactical competence based the internalisation of codes belonging to a particular musical language. Others still are linked to the semantic qualities of music and their capacity to evoke different imaginary forms or mental representations, which in turn can engender emotional responses. This paper focuses on the « Mors stupebit » section of Verdis Requiem in order to identify the multiple layers of mechanisms being at work in evoking the emotion of fear.

Keywords:   Verdi, Requiem, Fear, Music semiology, Emotions, music

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