Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
External Influences on EnglishFrom its Beginnings to the Renaissance$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

D. Gary Miller

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199654260

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199654260.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 07 December 2019

Continuity and revival of classical learning 1

Continuity and revival of classical learning 1

Chapter:
(p.192) 7 Continuity and revival of classical learning1
Source:
External Influences on English
Author(s):

D. Gary Miller

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199654260.003.0007

Revival of the liberal arts and classical studies at several times was responsible for multiple periods of influx of Greek and Latin loanwords in English. This chapter outlines the works that were influential on the external history of English in connection with the continental background to the events in the British Isles discussed in previous chapters. The main topics are Ecclesiastical Latin, the reforms of Alcuin and Medieval Latin, the Humanistic and Neolatin of the Renaissance, the effects of printing and other factors on standardization, latinate vocabulary in Shakespeare and other literary works, and the technical and scientific terminology in the post‐Renaissance period.

Keywords:   liberal arts, classical studies, Greek, Latin, Ecclesiastical Latin, Alcuin Latin, Medieval Latin, printing, standardization, Shakespeare

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .