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The BRIC States and Outward Foreign Direct Investment$
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David Collins

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199652716

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199652716.001.0001

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India

India

Chapter:
(p.75) 4 India
Source:
The BRIC States and Outward Foreign Direct Investment
Author(s):

David Collins

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199652716.003.0004

This chapter explains the process of outward foreign direct investment (FDI) from India. Since the liberalisation of its economy in the early 1990s, India has experienced significant economic reforms. The Indian government had loosed regulations for the outbound flow of capital and had eliminated the requirement of approval for foreign joint ventures during the various stages of economic liberalisation. The concentration of Indian outward FDI in the developed countries, especially Europe, is its most prominent characteristic. It has also developed in response to the government's relaxation of the laws governing outward expansion from the 1990s onward. The most important barriers to India's accession to a multilateral services investment treaty seem to be its desire to assure knowledge transfer in connection with FDI and its foreign ownership limits in financial services and telecommunications.

Keywords:   outward foreign direct investment, india, economic liberalisation, indian government, foreign ownership, europe, multilateral services investment treaty, financial services, telecommunications

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