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The SelfNaturalism, Consciousness, and the First-Person Stance$

Jonardon Ganeri

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199652365

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199652365.001.0001

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(p.365) Index

(p.365) Index

Source:
The Self
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Abhidharma42, 129–38, 144, 147–8, 328
defining traits127
as phenomenological psychology218
relationship with Yogācāra42–3, 131, 148, 167, 218 see also Buddhaghosa; Sthiramati; Vasubandhu
Abhinavagupta10, 190, 217
Achilles arguments234–5, 283, 290
Narrow vs Broad284–5, 303, 313
action-guidance11, 255, 261, 267
adjectival dependence4, 35–42, 55, 120, 139, 257, 265, 286–7
Advaita Vedānta25, 42, 209, 307, 309
affordance8, 130
agent causation252–7
Ajita Keśambalin27
ājīvika naturalism26–7
Albahari, Miri42, 112, 124, 331
Alexander, Samuel69, 87, 94, 98
Alexander of Aphrodisias76, 77
al-Faḍl, Abu30
alien insertion see thought insertion
Amiel, Henri F.329–30
Animalism6, 28, 40, 50, 65, 71, 97–9, 105ff., 114–24, 212, 225, 240, 315, 318, 328
anomalous monism129
Anscombe, G. E. M.160–1
appraisal as a component of emotion12, 268–80, 325
appraisal space, see hodological appraisal space
appraising (vedanā)7, 31, 127–8, 130, 135, 137, 146, 193, 219, 320
Aristotle23, 75, 80, 138, 168, 225, 258
Aristoxenus75
Arnaud, Antoine168, 179
Arnold, Dan166, 218
Āryabhaṭa30
Asaṅga147, 151–69
‘aspect’ (abhāsa), see Dignāga; twin aspects theory
assistive causation (upakāraka)45, 88–91, 97
attending (vijñāna)7, 31, 127–8, 130, 136–8, 146, 150, 170, 193, 219, 271, 320
attention, the8, 166, 189, 913
‘mind’ (manas) as a mechanism of11, 34, 249ff., 272–3, 282, 318–19, 329
to one’s own states of mind8, 121–2, 146–54, 219, 241
Attenuation6, 164–5, 169, 181, 206, 217, 230, 299, 331
definition of61–2
Problem of65, 111, 123, 315
Augustine57–60
autonomy
in agency252–5, 325
individual14–15, 30, 99, 225, 312–15
of the mental over the physical5–6, 28, 44–5, 84, 88–90, 96
Thesis about nonconceptual content182
Aviddhakarṇa29
Avrimides, Anita167, 203
Āyurveda26
Bacon, John128
Baker, Lynne31, 39, 41, 63, 64, 112, 213–14, 243, 257, 264, 287, 314
Barresi, John55, 239
‘base’ (āśraya)40–8, 65–6, 119–20, 151–4, 166–7, 226–9, 232–4, 247–8, 250, 253, 313–14
definitions of38–9, 261, 327
Basham A. L.26
Bedau, Mark44, 45, 70, 80, 92, 94
Bergmann, Gustav38
Bermúdez, J. L.182
Berridge, K. C.269
Berryman, Syliva259
Bhaduri, Sadananda256, 263
Bhattacharya, Ananta Kumar99
Bhattacharya, Ramkrishna26, 27, 30, 72, 88, 89, 99, 100, 144, 254
(p.366) Bhāvivikta29, 88
Bilgrami, Akeel315
binding9–10, 13, 130, 173, 188ff., 221, 281, 288ff.
of subject-aspects into self-presentation200–2
Bodhi, Bhikku164, 218
bodily feeling7, 120–4
bodily transfer113–19
Bollée, Willem53, 56
Bortolotti, Lisa39, 321, 324–5
Bostock, David289
Brentano, Franz167, 169
Bṛhaspati29–30, 45, 70ff., 96, 98–9, 229
Broad, C. D.35, 69, 83, 91, 93–4, 98, 120, 140
Bronkhorst, Johannes29, 88, 253
Broome, Matthew39, 321, 324–5
Buddha, the27, 53, 55, 57, 319
first noble truth271
liberal naturalism of3–4, 31–3, 328
omniscience of205, 211–12
on suffering3–4, 31–2, 164, 205
on witnessing death164
Buddhaghosa133–4, 196
Buddhism2, 9, 25, 42–3, 127, 138, 144, 165, 166, 193, 323
and neuroscience32, 129–30, 137, 150–1, 180, 186, 245–6, 262, 322
phenomenological turn of32–3, 218, 323
Cakradhara30, 89
Campbell, John11, 39, 135, 161, 262, 285, 291–2, 296–7, 299, 301, 321, 329
Candrakānta232, 309–10
Candrakīrti48, 72, 136–7, 157, 161, 163, 176
Cardona, George78
Carpenter, A. D.139
Cartesian View, the40, 65, 164, 231
Cārvāka3–5, 11, 14, 40–1, 45–9, 54, 62, 135, 139, 144, 164, 229, 242, 259, 263, 285, 319, 328
against scripture30, 100–1
against speculative deductions30, 100
Cassam, Quassim285, 298–301
Castañeda, Hector-Neri219–20, 264
on ‘he himself’213–14
theory of I-strands215–16
Caston, Victor23, 75–6, 80, 86, 167–8, 179, 249, 266
causal closure26–8
causation in Nyāya, three kinds255–61
Chakrabarti, Arindam195, 284
Chalmers, David70, 81, 85, 92, 138, 247
Chattopadhyaya, Debiprasad99
Chisholm, Roderick99, 306
argument from entia successiva105–6, 108, 113, 120
Christman, John312
Chrudzimski, Arkadiusz128
Cicero74
Clark, Austen9, 183–98, 289
Cogito, the5, 57–60
‘cognitive fabrication’ (vikalpa)148–9, 161, 196
Colebrooke, H. T.74, 81–2
completeness of physics72
complexity5, 29, 43, 69–70, 81, 83, 87, 92, 104, 188
consciousness, list of mental capacities associated with103–4
conscious self-attention (mano-vijñāna)146, 148, 152, 219
constitution6, 36, 71, 79, 98, 129, 134
Constitution View, the41, 257
convergence conditions294–7
core self, the7, 120–3, 153
corpse argument115, 240–1
Coseru, Christian48, 136, 166, 195, 218
Covariance Argument, the77–8, 92, 233–4
Dainton, Barry41, 148
Damasio, A. R.41, 121
Davidson, Donald77, 128–30, 281
Davidson, Richard137, 262
De Caro, Mario20
delight116, 278–9, 31, 317
Del Toso, Krishna88
Dennett, Daniel4, 56
dependent origination (pratītya-samutpāda)55, 132, 139, 218
Descartes, René2, 40, 59, 168, 179–80, 227, 230, 235; see also Cartesian View, the
de se8, 64, 169
implicit vs explicit154–6
desire12, 116, 117, 136–7, 229, 231–2, 239, 242, 250–2, 268ff., 308, 310, 323, 325
determinism22, 26–9, 249–52
(p.367) Dharmakīrti7, 9–10, 43, 48, 131, 137, 169, 170, 176–7, 182ff., 215, 240, 259, 264–5, 280, 291–2, 331
argument from analogy for other minds202–4, 206–7
bottom-up method (foundationalism) criticized292–9
claims that perception involves error195–9
two sorts of phenomenal image (ākāra)187–8
Dharmottara190, 208
diaphanousness of the self121, 326
Dicaearchus of Messene74–6
Dignāga7, 163, 166, 182, 195, 198–200, 204, 219, 280, 322, 331
defence of reflexivism9, 166ff.
twin aspects theory9, 169–74, 185
discarnate existence and disembodiment14, 62, 183, 230–2, 247, 306, 309–10, 314, 316, 319, 331
Discursivity Thesis, the137
Distribution version of Spatial Parts Argument239, 244
downward causation5–6, 30, 70, 80, 88–91, 94, 144
Dretske, Fred89
Dreyfus, Georges147–8, 166, 169, 187, 191, 195, 322
dualism85, 164
property11, 102, 138, 247
substance40, 226–8
trope3, 129, 148
Dummett, Michael317
Dunne, John187, 191–2, 195–6, 201
Dupré, Jon24
dynamical systems theory5–6, 43–6, 65, 81, 92ff., 131, 139–40, 162
Ekstrom, Laura32, 312
embodied mind/self thesis6–7, 33, 48, 92, 97, 117ff., 232
embodiment3, 5, 13–14, 38–41, 60, 154, 158, 160, 220–1, 225, 239, 244, 248, 282, 298, 303ff., 318, 325–8
emergence23, 30–1, 35–7, 41, 43–7, 69ff., 98–9, 105, 109, 132–5, 139–44, 177, 216, 220–1, 227, 229, 238–9, 298, 310, 312, 314, 319
compatibilism with physicalism98
as transformation5–6, 45, 71, 79, 83–97, 101, 104
weak vs strong44, 81, 84, 92–3, 139, see also Cārvāka; Pudgalavāda; Flame View; Tornado View
Emergentism, British69, 81–2, 87, 94
emotion4, 12–14, 34, 39, 52, 65, 104, 130, 138, 204, 219, 225, 268ff.
and action-readiness14, 271, 276–7
neonate116–17, 231
as non-cognitive signals of congruence3, 268, 276, 278–82
target, focus, and content distinguished270
three core attribute12, 268ff.
and unconscious mechanisms of selection and comparison2, 262–6, 278–82 see also desire; pleasure
Empirics, Hellenistic30, 100
enabling conditions of experience293–4
enactivism6, 93
endorsement4, 11–12, 14, 39, 225, 245, 267, 324–31
defined32, 255, 281–2, 313
epiphenomenalism5, 22–3, 27, 30, 45, 70, 73, 75–6, 81, 85, 96, 139, 227, 249
Evans, Gareth155, 292–3, 301, 323
exclusion (apoha)182ff., 216
three roles distinguished186, 192, 194
exclusion problem, the5, 22, 70, 88, 93–5, 129–30
exemplification35–9, 244ff., 256
adjectival vs collective4, 35
bare vs ‘rooted’, see rootedness as a mode of exemplification
distinct modes of physical and mental11, 240, 245
Fasching, Walter124, 331
fear116, 269, 271, 279
feature cause (asamavāyi-kāraṇa)256–67
feature-placing190–99, 215
Feigl, H.98, 245
Feinberg, Irwin321–2, 329
fictionalism19–20, 22, 56, 64, 138
Field, Hartry20
Fink, Hans28
first person, the106, 200, 213, 242–4, 265, 317
anaphoric use within speech reports301–2
as involving an error9, 145, 153, 300
as metaphor157–62
(p.368) first-person perspective8, 9, 31, 63–4, 106, 113, 151–2, 162–3, 170, 173–4, 176, 303, 314
strong vs weak112–13, 214
first-person present-tense ascription of psychological states10, 103, 149, 160, 162, 199–201, 202, 271
First-Person Realism56, 312–17
first-person stance
in conflict with naturalism?62–4, 163–4, 326–7
vs first-person perspective8, 170, 173–4
inhabitation of2, 12, 14, 151, 219, 245, 267, 280, 282, 299, 325, 329
fission and personal identity117
Flame View, the4, 43, 46–7, 65, 92, 95, 108–11, 132, 138–9, 144, 328
Flanagan, Owen218
flux theory of mind6, 46, 92, 154
problems with188–90, 192, 285–9, 291–5
focal attention137, 189, 193, 215
four dimensionalism109–10, 247
Frankfurt, Harry12, 32, 325
freedom of will11, 22, 37, 255, 266, 267, 315, 325, 332
Frijda, Nico271, 274–5
Frith, C. D.11, 262, 266, 321–2, 329
functionalism102–3, 105, 228, 258
functional reduction70, 102–5, 141
fusion in emergence6, 45–6, 92, 95–6, 109
Gadādhara Bhaṭṭācārya302
Galen76, 86
Gallagher, Shaun41, 118, 122, 154, 203, 322
Galloway, Brian147–8
Gautama11, 13, 78, 234, 239–40, 248
Gillett, Carl87
Ginet, Carl254
God
as identical to space and time306–7
as lacking selfhood307–8, 311, 313
rejected in naturalism25, 30
Gośāla27
Graham, G.171, 322
Gubeljic, Mischa21
Guṇaprabhā147–8, 163
Guṇaratna26–8
Halbig, Christoph21
Haribhadra26–7, 29
harmonia theory23, 74–6, 249
Haskar, William35, 41, 57
having, two distinctions35–9
Heil, John20, 129–30
Hemacandra26
Henry, Aaron112
Henry, Devin235
Henry, Michel41, 121
higher-order theory9, 97, 167, 169, 173–6
hodological appraisal space8, 130, 270–1
Hoerl, Christoph325
Hoernle, A. F. R.26
Horgan, Terry171
human being (puruṣa)4, 25, 28, 64, 73, 97, 144
Hume, David40, 51–5, 100, 168,
Humean supervenience131
Humean View, the4, 32, 60, 164, 183, 217, 322
Humphreys, Paul45, 70, 95–6
Husserl, Edmund19, 41, 63, 167, 174, 218, 329
‘I’
as a metonym111, 158–62, 243
non-referential account of its use157, 160–2
as non-univocal111, 158–60
use as subject vs use as object63, 160–1 see also first-person, the
Iamblichus285, 316–17
Ibn Sina5, 57–60, 236–7, 244
identity theory of mind40, 76, 98, 129, 242, 245–8
imagination, appeals to5, 50, 57–61, 118, 277
immateriality of self denied1, 6, 24, 59, 63, 73, 98, 111, 119, 183, 228, 230, 284–5, 303, 314, 319
immersion2, 13–15, 145, 285, 303, 316–17, 327–32
bodily vs subjective accounts of123–4, 244
definition of7, 14, 329
three Buddhist accounts of8–9, 124
immunity to error through misidentification9, 62, 152, 160–2, 247, 265
impermanence, not the same as momentariness128, 311
‘impulse towards action’ (prayatna)27, 229, 249–55, 277, 279
individual cause (samavāyi-kāraṇa)252ff., 307
individual difference/differentiator (viśeṣa)305–9, 311
(p.369) ‘individual nature’ (svabhāva)25–30, 73
information retrieval11, 267, 318; see also repository-consciousness
inner sense-organ (antaḥ-kāraṇa)162–3, 166, 169, 262, 286
integration, cross-modal13, 215–16, 220, 283ff.
intentionality170–1, 245
as compositional7, 127–30, 138, 218–19
Ismael, Jenann180–1, 213, 329
I-strands214–20
Jackson, Frank188, 247
Jainism5, 25, 53–5; see also Guṇaratna; Haribhadra; Prabhācandra
James, William41, 120, 216
Janzen, Greg168–71, 178, 179
Javāli29
Jayanta Bhaṭṭa6, 41, 46, 85, 99ff., 237, 240, 270
Jayarāma Nyāyapañcānana310
Jayarāśi89
Jayatilleke, K. N.27–8
Jinendrabuddhi169
Jñānaśrīmitra10, 203, 209
Kamalaśīla75, 79, 90, 98, 100
Kamalāśvatara29
Kaṇāda11–13
Kant, Immanuel21, 41, 137, 163, 234, 235, 282–3, 290, 293–4, 327
karma, so-called laws of27, 30, 56
Karmo, Toomas46
Kashmiri Śaivism10, 190, 217, 322, 328
Kāśyapa53–7
Kaviraja, Gopinath26, 30
Keyt, C. M.191
Kierkegaard, Søren174
Kim, Jaegwon128, 138, 226–8, 233, 248, 314–15
on emergence5, 70, 80, 86, 97
on the exclusion problem23, 88–90
on functional reduction102, 105, 141
on supervenience20, 98
Klong chen pa33
Koons, Robert233, 247
Korsgaard, Christine280
Kramer, Jowita147
Kriegel, Uriah166, 171, 177
Kripke, Saul247
Kṛṣṇadāsa308
Kulkarni, V. M.25
Kumārila Bhaṭṭa38, 47, 118, 202, 243, 253
Lakoff, George118, 263
Lambie, J.271
Lennon, Thomas284
Levine, Joseph198
Lewes, George69
Lewin, K.271
Lewis, David20, 98, 109, 131, 142, 227
liberation101, 115, 230, 305–6
as not involving individual survival14, 232, 309–10, 317
Libet, Benjamin266
local qualities131
Locke, John55, 168, 208, 298–9
Loewer, Barry131
Lowe, E. J.38, 43, 70, 89, 228, 237, 247, 252–4, 257
Lusthaus, Dan135, 149
Lycan, William262
Macdonald, Cynthia70, 129
Macdonald, Graham70
McDowell, John3, 21–3, 32, 55, 57, 160, 315–16
MacKenzie, Matthew166
McLaughlin, Brian69–70
McRea, Michael257
Mādhavācārya242
Madhyamaka25, 43, 48, 65, 131, 161, 167, 176, 328; see also Candrakīrti; Nāgārjuna
Mahābhārata, the26, 251
Mahādeva Puṇatāṃkara230, 312
Malcolm, Norman172, 245
manas
as pre-attentive modality of self-consciousness, see ‘mineness-marker’
as unconscious mechanism of selection and comparison, see ‘mind’; underself
‘manifestation’ of mental properties75–6
Many Cognizers version of Spatial Parts Argument239–40, 247, 261
many-domains vs multiple-tiers world-views227–8, 233–4, 241–2, 247–8, 260
many properties, individual substance as locus of285, 294–5, 299
(p.370) Many Properties Problem, the188–9, 194, 201
Marcel, A.271
Marcel, Gabriel121
Martin, C. B.131
Martin, Raymond40, 55, 239
material cause (upādāna-kāraṇa)78–80, 84, 89–91, 256–7
material constitution6, 71, 98ff.
materialism5, 11, 40, 99, 105–6, 180, 227, 235–6, 239, 257, 328
Materialist View, the4, 40, 47–8, 50, 85, 99, 110
Matilal, B. K.179, 256, 269–70, 284
matter (bhūta), theories about28–9, 127, 132
Matthen, Mohan198
mechanistic theories of mind104–5
Meltzoff, Andrew220, 287
mental files8, 122, 144, 150–2, 156, 167, 174, 219, 291; see also repository-consciousness
mereological essentialism107, 110
Merleau-Ponty, M.41, 123, 244
Metzinger, Thomas20, 47, 264–5
Mijuskovic, B. L.235, 283
Milinda-pañhā, the188, 283, 298
Mill, J. S.69, 81–2, 83
Millar, Alan183
Millikan, Ruth290
Mīmāṃsā235
‘mind’ (manas) as unconscious mechanism2, 4, 11–12, 14–15, 34, 65, 123, 169, 179–80, 221, 249ff., 272, 278–81, 292, 299, 313–14, 318–19, 327–8, 331–2
dual roles of265–7 see also underself
mind-body problem, the63, 73, 218–19, 225ff.
‘mineness-marker’ (manas)124, 144, 151ff., 167, 173, 193, 205, 219
minimal physicalism3, 11, 226–9, 233, 267
minimal self8, 41, 122, 153–4, 167
Mipham, Ju33–4
mixtion properties (citra-rūpa)259–60, 263
Mokṣākaragupta190
Moran, Richard12, 136, 255, 322, 324–6
Moreland, J. P.37–8, 311
Morgan, C. Lloyd69
Moriyama, Shinya177, 200
multiple realisation247
Nāgārjuna25, 167, 199
Nagel, Ernest141–2, 144
Nagel, Thomas85, 118, 246
naturalism
hard or scientific1–3, 19–20, 23–9, 31, 40, 47, 52, 56, 62–3, 92, 138, 180–1, 322, 327
metaphysical vs epistemological19, 50ff.
raw and rich23–4
two senses distinguished in Strawson20–1, 23
naturalization19–21, 47, 57, 65, 93, 174, 218, 267, 318
non-conceptual content9, 103, 169, 182ff.
Autonomy Thesis182
Construction Thesis183
Noordhof, Paul80
No Place Views4, 42–3, 46–9, 124, 139–40, 144, 150, 154, 167, 191, 201, 205–6, 319, 328
Nyāya-Vaiśeṣika View, the4, 33, 41, 49, 123, 254, 260, 319, 323, 328, 331 see also Ownership View, the
objective conception of the world200–1, 221, 264–5, 293–6, 303
objective referent (ālambana)62–3
objectivity24, 145, 293, 295; see also ‘two truths’
O’Connor, Timothy44, 70, 80, 84, 95, 140, 253
Olson, Eric241, 257
one-dimensional views of self40
O’Shaughnessy, Brian178, 231, 241, 252, 266
other minds330
conceptual problem of10, 154, 165, 167, 181, 202ff., 303
(p.371) problem of250
ownership1, 3–5, 7–8, 11–14, 34, 35, 37–49, 61, 65–6, 113, 117, 124, 131–2, 140, 144, 147, 151, 153, 163–4, 167, 169, 217–18, 221, 252, 256, 261–2, 266, 271, 299, 307, 312–31
causal agency model of rejected319–23
common, and the individuation of selves3, 12–13, 225, 267–8, 279–82, 305, 314–16, 318, 327
different conceptions distinguished324
three strands, see immersion; participation; coordination
Ownership View, the38, 40–1, 66, 99, 226–9, 248, 257–8, 318, 328
Minimal120–3, 205
panpsychism84–6, 251
Papineau, David19
Parfit, Derek36–7, 40, 48, 114, 116, 140, 204, 257, 285, 293, 300
participant self, the12, 14, 32–3, 113, 221, 225, 248, 255, 268, 278, 282, 308, 319, 329–31
participation1, 2, 4, 11–15, 39, 121, 299, 303, 317, 327–32
definition of12, 14, 329
Patil, Parimal198
Payāsi5, 29–30, 53–7, 71, 98, 100
Payāsi’s Trap57, 92, 313, 320
Peacocke, Christopher9, 112, 167, 182–3
Perry, John155
persistence6, 43, 98ff., 147–8, 313
through chemical change106–9
through substantial vs qualitative change 107–9
Persistence Argument, the11, 30, 234–5, 240
Persistence Problem, the65, 123
person6, 28, 40, 52, 55, 71–3, 98, 115, 127–8, 140, 144, 157, 160, 163–4, 324–5
personal identity55, 107, 114, 117, 140, 157, 164, 287
perspectival de se8, 112
phenomenal
character of experience8, 15, 137–8, 170–1, 183ff.
property, vs content-explaining property133, 184–5, 188–9, 198, 232
structure of self-consciousness7, 10, 47, 66, 119, 150ff., 214ff., 264, 322, 331
Phenomenal View, the40–1, 65, 124, 169, 217, 328
phenomenological psychology148, 218
phenomenological tradition, the41, 121, 167
phenomenology34, 55, 127, 180, 198, 217, 262, 266, 270, 322
of intentionality171, 238
of the first-personal7, 14, 32, 63, 65, 118, 215ff., 314, 319, 329; see also immersion
transcendental218
Philoponus77, 259
physical basis of deep character (avijñapti-rūpa)135
physical constituents, primary and derivative132–3
physicalism5, 28, 57, 72, 77, 96, 98, 138, 228, 240, 261
minimal3, 11, 226–9, 258, 267
reductive138, 239, 258
physical realization6, 95, 103–4, 129, 134, 314
Place, U. T.98, 245
‘place’ (ādhāra)65, 106, 109–11, 167, 236, 248, 310, 313, 326–7
defined38–9, 261
Plato28, 58, 249–50, 280, 289
pleasure30, 31, 101, 104, 116, 117, 229–33, 250, 254, 264, 277–80
analysed12, 268–9, 271, 272ff.
asymmetrical relationship with pain274–5
distribution of27–8
four types273–4, 275–6
self as place of100–1, 282, 285–6, 304–10, 326
spatial location237
Plutarch74–5
Porphyry58, 306
Prabhācandra5, 41, 57–60, 62–4, 76, 79, 89, 98, 110, 116–18, 163, 169, 231, 244, 251, 257, 287
Praśastapāda119, 165, 259, 283, 298, 305–6, 313
five arguments against mental properties being properties of the body11, 234–48
on intention251–2
theory of emotion12, 116, 268ff.
pratītya-samutpāda; see dependent origination
privacy of access to one’s mental states242, 245–6
(p.372) Proclus236
proprioceptive perception60, 104, 123, 133, 244, 292
prosektikon, of ‘Philoponus’168, 266
Pseudo-Nāgārjuna116
pudgala
interpretations of47, 138–45
proper translation of140
Pudgala Realism (pudglala-vāda)43, 139, 144
Purandara29
Pure Consciousness View, the4, 40, 42, 48, 65, 122, 124, 169, 206, 217, 309, 328, 331
Putnam, Hilary247, 258
qualiton128, 130, 137, 143; see also trope metaphysics of mind
quality, see phenomenal property
quality space184–8, 190, 194, 197
quasi-objects10, 192ff., 202, 264, 285, 299
quasi-subject theory of self-consciousness8, 10, 144, 199ff., 202, 215, 264, 292, 300, 318, 331
Quine, V. W.19, 50
Raghudeva Nyāyālaṃkāra309
Raghunātha Śiromaṇi284, 300–2, 306–10, 313, 317, 319
Rāmakaṇṭha217
Ratnakīrti7, 10, 167, 203ff., 216–17
reactive attitudes315
readying, experiential (saṃskāra)7, 8, 31, 127, 130, 137–8, 146, 193, 219, 320
Recanati, François61, 154–8
recognition or reidentification13, 136, 287, 296
reduction
functional see functional reduction
Nagelian141–2
reductionism, cautious vs incautious20, 143
Reductionism, refutation of285ff.
Reductionist View, the4, 40, 47–8, 50, 65, 111, 140, 144, 293, 300–1, 318
reflexive self-awareness41, 48, 59, 63, 97, 103, 124, 199, 200, 202–4, 217, 219, 303
reflexivism9–10, 166ff., 199, 205, 318, 322, 327, 331–2
entails conceptual solipsism212–17
weakened version of97, 177, 322
registering (rūpa)7, 31, 127–8, 130, 133–7, 146, 193, 219, 320
Reisenzein, Rainer11, 262, 279, 329
repository-consciousness (ālaya-vijñāna) as mental file8, 148–9, 151, 155–6, 161, 164, 167, 219, 292, 319
research programmes in the study of the self48–9, 65, 319
Riepe, Dale25–6, 30
ritual law vs natural law24–31
Robb, David129
rootedness, as a mode of exemplification39, 151, 266–7, 282, 306–7, 314, 319, 325, 327, 329, 332
Rorty, Richard32
Rosenthal, David168–9
rubber hand illusion220, 298
Rueger, Alexander44, 46, 80
Ryle, Gilbert121
Śaiva Siddhānta10, 169, 190, 217, 328
Saṃghabhadra133, 143–4
Śaṃkara (Ācārya)62, 78
Śaṃkara Miśra231–2, 243, 263–4, 269–70, 273, 331
Sāṃkhya25, 73
Śāntarakṣita26, 33, 48, 171, 242
Sartre, Jean-Paul41, 167–8, 217, 313
Sassen, Brigitte234
Sautrāntika43, 48, 328
Scherer, K. R.275
Schmithausen, Lambert148
Schorr, A.275
scientific turn in philosophy2, 19; see also naturalism, scientific
Seager, J. R.85
Searle, John84, 87
second nature, Aristotelian3, 21, 138
self, the
definition of1–3
eleven Views about39–49
and embodiment, see embodiment; ‘base’
and the emotions, see emotion; ownership, common
eternality/permanence of rejected13, 101, 167, 216, 285, 303, 311–13, 316, 319
as not a bare particular306–17; see also rootedness as a mode of exemplification
as the place of the mental, see ‘place’
(p.373) sophisticated realism about317
two things a theory of must do6–7, 111
as a unity of immersion, participation, and coordination13, 15, 285, 303, 317, 332
self-consciousness1, 10, 13, 65, 97, 124, 138, 165, 193, 199–203, 247, 263–4, 292, 319, 322
base of133
composition of179, 213–20, 318
perspectival vs reflective112
reflexivism vs higher-orderism; see reflexivism
two concepts of8, 146ff.
selfhood6, 12, 53, 100, 112, 117, 119, 121, 221, 319
as a kind305–13
self-knowledge60, 63, 178, 245, 264, 271, 323–4
Self-Knowledge Argument, the11, 100, 234, 241–2, 245–6
self-monitoring, mechanisms of11, 162, 265–7, 317, 321
Self-Reference Argument, the11, 234–5, 242, 247
Sellars, Wilfred21, 24
Principle of Reducibility35–6, 142, 260–1
Sen, P. K.88, 309
sensory qualities, see phenomenal property
sentience
relational theory vs sense-data analysis9, 183, 187, 196, 199
Sextus Empiricus74
Shapiro, Lawrence118, 232
Shoemaker, Sydney36, 38, 52–4, 59–60, 62, 70, 93–6, 112, 114, 151–2, 160, 241
Shukla, Badrinath88, 99, 123, 238
Sider, Theodore38, 109, 257
Siderits, Mark48, 218, 327
Śīlāṅka27
Silberstein, Michael92
Simons, Peter128
skandha as proto-intentional psychological process7, 127, 147, 219
Smart, J. J. C98, 245–6
Smith, Brian K.25
solipsism6, 10, 111, 216–17
Solomon, Esther88
Sorabji, Richard40, 57–8, 77, 168, 249, 259, 266, 269, 280, 306
sorrow104, 116, 278–9
Sosa, Ernest240–1, 256
Spatial Parts Argument, the11, 100, 234–5, 238–9, 246–7, 325
specious present, the110, 216, 220
Spence, A.11, 266, 321–2
Spinoza, Baruch55
Śrīdhara230, 237, 239, 241, 243, 259, 261, 272–4, 279, 290, 305
Stcherbatsky, Theodore50, 130, 137
Steel, Carlos285, 316–17
Stein, Nathanael255
Stephens, G. L.322
stereotyping (saṃjñā)7, 31, 127–8, 130, 135, 137, 146, 193, 219, 320
Sthiramati147, 156–7, 163
Stoljar, D.85
Stout, G. F.128
Strawson, Galen41–2, 85, 158–9
Strawson, Peter F.3, 14, 35–6, 37, 113, 146, 152, 157, 162–3, 190–2, 253–5, 288, 293, 295–6, 315, 325, 331
on attenuation61–2, 65, 230–1
on ‘having1’ and ‘having235, 39
Strawsonian concept of a person4, 40, 73, 123, 144, 164, 238; see also human being (puruṣa)
two senses of naturalism, see naturalism, two senses in Strawson
Stroud, Barry24
structural properties44, 94, 140–3, 215, 220, 259
subjectivity1, 7, 10, 14, 65, 97, 144–5, 166, 173–4, 177, 178, 199–200, 202, 318, 322, 327–8
access to the subjectivity of one’s past mental life9, 171–4 see also immersion; reflexivism
substratum38, 40, 55, 107, 132, 307
supernatural, the22, 24–5, 29–30, 71, 96, 100, 228, 313–14
supervenience20, 23, 42, 48, 98, 129, 132–5, 150, 229–33, 248, 251, 255, 332
and emergence4, 6, 31, 44–5, 70, 77–80, 92, 96
multiple-domain226–8, 255–61, 267 see also Humean supervenience
survival14, 62, 114–15, 230, 232, 281, 305, 309
systemic causation92
Taylor, C. C. W.75
therapeutic use of philosophical ideas57, 309
(p.374) Thompson, Evan7, 46, 48, 93, 112, 148, 166–7, 218
thought insertion
Tibetan42, 148
exegesis of Indian theories of self33, 166, 172, 176
historiography about India25
Tienson, John171
Tillemans, Tom195
Tornado View, the4, 6, 43, 45–7, 92, 94–5, 111, 132, 328
touch, primacy of134–5, 290
tracking vs reidentifying objects13, 178, 290–2
transformation, see emergence as transformation
transient subjects of consciousness8, 41, 307
Transitivity Principle, the168, 278
trans-ordinal law83, 91
Treisman, A.189
trope metaphysics of mind42, 47, 127ff., 151, 154, 182, 217, 258
Tsakiris, M.220, 298
Tucci, Giuseppe30
Tuske, Joerg270
‘two truths’, the doctrine of24, 145, 205
Udayana239, 252, 269–70, 273, 284, 296
Udbhaṭa Bhaṭṭa6, 29, 30, 45, 88–9, 100, 319
Uddyotakara80, 232–3, 237, 239, 241, 251, 256, 279, 284, 307, 317
unity of self4, 34, 88, 120, 216, 220, 267, 304
role of emotions in2, 278–82, 326
Unity Argument, the11, 13, 30, 100, 234–6, 247, 283ff; see also Achilles arguments
universals
causal role of197–9, 209–11, 310–12
distinguished from particulars191–2
Upaniṣads, the25, 28, 41, 53, 100, 121, 164, 205, 235, 283, 328
Vācaspati85, 117–18, 122, 232, 242, 269, 284
van Cleve, James70, 77, 85
van Inwagen, Peter114
Vareli, Fransisco46
Vātsiputrīya Buddhism43, 47, 139, 144, 328 see also Pudglala Realism
Vātsyāyana119, 165, 168, 230ff., 248, 249–50, 263–4, 275, 279–80, 284, 286–7, 291, 295, 307, 323, 326
Velleman, David57, 236
Vendler, Zeno61
Vyomaśiva41, 272–4, 304–5
Waldron, William127, 130, 136, 148, 156
Wallace, Alan218
Watson, Alex63, 124, 169
Weil, Simone159, 279
Westerhoff, Jan25
Weyl, Hermann63, 329
‘what it is like’‐ness, see phenomenal character of experience
Williams, Bernard13, 61, 114, 136, 155, 304, 315
Williams, D. C.128
Williams, Paul166, 171, 176
Williford, Kenneth41, 166, 177, 217
Wilson, Jessica98
Wittgenstein, Ludwig42, 60, 158–60
Wong, Hong Yu84, 95–6
Yablo, S.20, 22
Yao, Zhihua166
Zahavi, Dan7, 19, 41, 48, 121, 122, 124, 153, 154, 156, 167, 179, 203, 264, 327
Zimmerman, Dean106