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Virtues and Their Vices$
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Kevin Timpe and Craig A. Boyd

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199645541

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199645541.001.0001

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Moral Psychology, Neuroscience, and Virtue: From Moral Judgment to Moral Character

Moral Psychology, Neuroscience, and Virtue: From Moral Judgment to Moral Character

Chapter:
(p.458) (p.459) 21 Moral Psychology, Neuroscience, and Virtue: From Moral Judgment to Moral Character
Source:
Virtues and Their Vices
Author(s):

James A. Van Slyke

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199645541.003.0022

A proliferation of research in the science of morality has attempted to provide models of moral judgment based on the modern assumption of investigating individual ethical decisions and the use of dual processing models of decision-making with emotion and cognition often at odds with each other. In contrast, virtue ethics emphasizes character more than individual decisions and claims that emotion and reason work cooperatively in the execution of moral acts. Recent advances in neuroscience suggest potential neural and psychological mechanisms that play an important role in the formation of moral character based on the imitation of the behavior of moral exemplars and the simulation of their disposition towards virtuous action, which is based on the integration of cognitive and emotional appraisals of morally relevant information.

Keywords:   moral exemplars, character formation, imitation, simulation, science of morality, moral judgment

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