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Virtues and Their Vices$
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Kevin Timpe and Craig A. Boyd

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199645541

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199645541.001.0001

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On Hope

On Hope

Chapter:
(p.348) (p.349) 16 On Hope
Source:
Virtues and Their Vices
Author(s):

Charles Pinches

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199645541.003.0017

As Aquinas notes, ‘hope’ names a natural passion shared with other animals; it moves us toward some future possible, but arduous, good. The related theological virtue builds on this, strengthening us for the human journey through time, reaching with magnanimity toward what is our highest good. Hope opposes despair, as well as sloth, which sap our strength, and also presumption, which underestimates our need for help. Theological hope lies between its companion theological virtues of faith and love, but is also closely related to the moral virtues of fortitude and humility. Via hope we learn to lean on the Divine assistance, claiming the truths of faith, not only abstractly but concretely and personally. By love, we learn that ‘my hope’ is shared, and in its light hope’s political implications are made manifest.

Keywords:   natural passion, theological virtue, arduous good, despair, presumption, magnanimity, fortitude, humility

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