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Virtues and Their Vices$
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Kevin Timpe and Craig A. Boyd

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199645541

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199645541.001.0001

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A Study of Virtuous and Vicious Anger

A Study of Virtuous and Vicious Anger

Chapter:
(p.199) 9 A Study of Virtuous and Vicious Anger
Source:
Virtues and Their Vices
Author(s):

Zac Cogley

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199645541.003.0010

This chapter presents an account of an angrily virtuous, or patient, person informed by research on emotion in empirical and philosophical psychology, using Frederick Douglass and Martin Luther King, Jr., as examples. This chapter argues that virtue for anger is determined by excellence and deficiency with respect to all three of anger’s psychological functions: appraisal, motivation, and communication. Many competing accounts of virtue for anger assess it by attention to just one function; it is argued that singular evaluations of a person’s anger will ignore important dimensions of anger that bear on virtue and vice. Thus, possessing excellence with respect to only one function of anger is insufficient for virtue. The account is also extended to the characteristic vices of anger: wrath and meekness

Keywords:   anger, appraisal, douglass, emotion, excellence, king, motivation, vice, virtue

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