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Theology as Science in Nineteenth-Century GermanyFrom F.C. Baur to Ernst Troeltsch$
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Johannes Zachhuber

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199641918

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199641918.001.0001

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A Science without Presuppositions: David Strauss

A Science without Presuppositions: David Strauss

Chapter:
(p.73) 4 A Science without Presuppositions: David Strauss
Source:
Theology as Science in Nineteenth-Century Germany
Author(s):

Johannes Zachhuber

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199641918.003.0004

This chapter contains an in-depth analysis of the early work of David Strauss within the context of the Tübingen School. It is argued that he radicalizes Baur’s ‘neo-rationalist’ approach of a separation of history and religious truth. This interpretation qualifies traditional claims about his ‘Hegelianism’; in fact the chapter shows that he is probably the first person to have shifted the term Wissenschaft from its idealistic use (= system of knowledge) to its alignment with the empirical and inductive methods of the natural sciences. Strauss’s own references to Hegel’s philosophy are examined in detail and it is shown that their foundation is incompatible with the principles of Idealism. The same point is argued through an examination of his theory of myth.

Keywords:   D.F. Strauss, Hegelianism, F.C. Baur, Wissenschaft, progress, exegesis, The Life of Jesus, Christology, pantheism, myth, gospels, rationalism, supranaturalism

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