Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
England's Culture WarsPuritan Reformation and its Enemies in the Interregnum, 1649-1660$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Bernard Capp

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199641789

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199641789.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 19 January 2020

Worldly Pleasures: Plays, Shows, Sports

Worldly Pleasures: Plays, Shows, Sports

Chapter:
(p.196) 10 Worldly Pleasures: Plays, Shows, Sports
Source:
England's Culture Wars
Author(s):

Bernard Capp

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199641789.003.0010

This chapter explores the regime's attitude to the theatre, to elite pursuits such as hunting, hawking and horse-racing, and to sports, games, and festive revelry. It examines how far plays and shows survived in London, and at efforts by William Davenant and others to develop more acceptable reformed productions, the early opera. It examines evidence of amateur performances in the provinces, alongside private performances in the homes of the elite. Hunting and hawking were approved and often pursued by the new ruling elites, but fears over security led to repeated interruptions of racing. Animal sports such as bear-baiting and cock-fighting were also suppressed on security grounds, and sports such as football were similarly curbed until discipline weakened in the final months of the interregnum.

Keywords:   theatre, plays, shows, hunting, horse-racing, sport, football

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .