Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Work of ManagersTowards a Practice Theory of Management$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Stefan Tengblad

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199639724

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199639724.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 08 April 2020

Overcoming the rationalistic fallacy in management research

Overcoming the rationalistic fallacy in management research

Chapter:
(p.3) 1 Overcoming the rationalistic fallacy in management research
Source:
The Work of Managers
Author(s):

Stefan Tengblad

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199639724.003.0001

The editor presents the book’s origins, purpose, and structure. Taking inspiration from the work of the Swedish researcher, Sune Carlson, the chapter presents a practice perspective on management that avoids the scientists’ yardstick prescriptions of how managerial work should be competently performed. In the practice perspective, managers are viewed as competent practitioners who cope daily with intense demands, complexity, and uncertainty. Reasons are offered to explain the popularity of the theoretical–analytical perspective that predominates in contemporary management research. The researchers whose work is presented in the book’s following seventeen chapters take this perspective as they examine the realities of information and work overload, complexity, uncertainty, performance pressure, surprises, unintended consequences, and irreconcilable expectations, to say nothing of the emotional demands of work. The chapter calls for a strong research tradition based on these realities of managerial work.

Keywords:   Sune Carlson, management research, information overload, work overload, complexity, performance pressure, emotional demands

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .