Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Synge and Edwardian Ireland$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Brian Cliff and Nicholas Grene

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199609888

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199609888.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 18 January 2020

Stalking Yeats

Stalking Yeats

The Celebrity System of Revivalist Dublin

Chapter:
(p.34) 3 Stalking Yeats
Source:
Synge and Edwardian Ireland
Author(s):

Lucy McDiarmid

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199609888.003.0004

The memoirs of J. M. Synge’s friends and contemporaries (Mary Colum, W. B. Yeats, Beatrice Lady Glenavy, William Orpen, George Moore, and others) show how proximity to the great and famous functioned as part of an implicit celebrity system in the Dublin of the Irish Revival: value spread from the chief to the minor celebrities, and to everyone who met them once or stalked them through the city. Mary Colum stalked Yeats and saved his cigarette butt, and Seamus O’Sullivan entered a store George Moore had just left, seeking to buy the same brand of tobacco. Contemporary celebrity theory does not fit the Irish Revival, whose stars were not inaccessibly remote but intimates who walked the same streets. Celebrities one bumps into are less godlike, and in the Dublin of the Irish Revival, reverence coexisted with irreverence.

Keywords:   Irish Revival, celebrity theory, W.B. Yeats, Irish memoirs, George Moore, Dublin, Mary Colum

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .