Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Being SovietIdentity, Rumour, and Everyday Life under Stalin 1939–1953$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Timothy Johnston

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199604036

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199604036.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 18 July 2019

The Liberator State? The Crisis of Official Soviet Identity during the Pact Period 1939–1941

The Liberator State? The Crisis of Official Soviet Identity during the Pact Period 1939–1941

Chapter:
(p.2) (p.3) 1 The Liberator State? The Crisis of Official Soviet Identity during the Pact Period 1939–1941
Source:
Being Soviet
Author(s):

Timothy Johnston

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199604036.003.0001

Official representations of Soviet diplomatic identity became increasingly incoherent in the months between the Nazi‐Soviet Pact (August 1939) and the German invasion of the USSR (June 1941). Despite official boasting about the success of Stalin’s ‘peace’ policy, rumours of war were extremely widespread and successful in this period. The cultural identity of the USSR in this period focused on the greatness of Soviet civilization and the extension of Stalinist liberty to the newly occupied borderlands. However, the occupying soldiers passed back large volumes of luxury goods and also stories of capitalist wealth from the new Polish and Finnish territories. Alongside Pravda’s refusal to admit to the losses of the Winter War, these changes led many Soviet citizens to rely more heavily on the tactic of bricolage, fusing information obtained via official and unofficial sources, in order to make sense of international affairs.

Keywords:   1939, 1941, diplomacy, rumours, Nazi-Soviet Pact, Winter War, occupation, capitalism, Pravda, borderland

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .