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Achilles in LoveIntertextual Studies$
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Marco Fantuzzi

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199603626

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199603626.001.0001

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Briseis

Briseis

Chapter:
(p.99) 3 Briseis
Source:
Achilles in Love
Author(s):

Marco Fantuzzi

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199603626.003.0003

Achilles' almost consistent silence about his feelings for Briseis is investigated through the lens of the Hellenistic interpreters of Homer, who appear to downplay the few sentimental phrases Achilles utters about Briseis and magnifying her love for him. This perspective of the Hellenistic scholars is also reflected in Ovid's “Heroids” 3, where the loving Briseis is confronted with a completely chilly Achilles, and is later developed by other authors of Latin elegy, including Ovid himself, who create a full-love story of Achilles and Briseis. The rich iconography of this love story in the Imperial age is also investigated.

Keywords:   epic time = “honor”, epic geras = “prize of honor”, sexuality and “military” epos, sentimentality of Achilles, Bacchylides, Achilles' music, Homeric scholarship, Quintus of Smyrna, Latin elegy, Propertius, Ovid, abandoned Woman, ideology of, ideas of “wife”, and Briseis, wife and domina in Latin elegy

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