Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Alexandra of LycophronA Literary Study$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Charles McNelis and Alexander Sens

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780199601899

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199601899.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 10 December 2019

The Best of the Achaeans Redefined

The Best of the Achaeans Redefined

Cassandra’s Achilles

Chapter:
(p.101) 5 The Best of the Achaeans Redefined
Source:
The Alexandra of Lycophron
Author(s):

Charles McNelis

Alexander Sens

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199601899.003.0005

Throughout her prophecy, Cassandra pointedly denies glory, kleos, to Greeks at precisely those places in the narrative that correspond to moments in the literary tradition where they attain it, whereas she grants it to members of her own family, both near and extended, in terms that evoke antecedent treatment of Greek kleos. In this sense, the Alexandra comments, implicitly and tendentiously, on the power of the literary tradition, and especially epic, to compensate heroes for their suffering and death. This chapter explores Cassandra’s treatment of one of the most important heroes of the epic tradition, Achilles. Cassandra’s account subverts the epic treatment of that hero, casting him as effeminate and suggesting that he received no real compensation for his martial activities and early death.

Keywords:   Achilles, kleos, prophecy, literary tradition, epic, hero

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .