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Liberalism as IdeologyEssays in Honour of Michael Freeden$
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Ben Jackson and Marc Stears

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199600670

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199600670.001.0001

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The Liberal Dilemma: The Economic and the Social, and the Need for a European Contextualization of a Concept with Universal Pretensions

The Liberal Dilemma: The Economic and the Social, and the Need for a European Contextualization of a Concept with Universal Pretensions

Chapter:
(p.95) 5 The Liberal Dilemma: The Economic and the Social, and the Need for a European Contextualization of a Concept with Universal Pretensions
Source:
Liberalism as Ideology
Author(s):

Bo Stråth

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199600670.003.0006

There is not one liberalism but several, each of which has contributed to the modernity of Europe. The collection of arguments that we call liberalism reflects the deep historical diversity of Europe, a diversity that since the nineteenth century has had the demarcation between nation states as a point of departure. To argue that each specific national culture has had its own understanding and experience of liberalism is to underestimate the complexity, however, because in each national setting there have been various more or less contested versions. This chapter argues that there is a need to historicize and contextualize liberalism through the methodology of conceptual history, to particularize (‘provincialize’) what is claimed to be universal. The chapter focuses on the liberal conceptualization of the economic, and on the connection between market language and the social issue.

Keywords:   European modernity, liberalism, nation states, conceptual history, provincialization, economics, social issue, market language

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