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Between EmpiresArabs, Romans, and Sasanians in Late Antiquity$
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Greg Fisher

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199599271

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199599271.001.0001

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The Jafnids and History in East and West

The Jafnids and History in East and West

Chapter:
(p.194) 6 The Jafnids and History in East and West
Source:
Between Empires
Author(s):

Greg Fisher (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199599271.003.0006

This chapter concludes the study and draws the different aspects — political, cultural, linguistic, and religious — together. It assess the place of the Jafnids and Nasrids in the history of Late Antiquity and, also, in wider historical schema, such as state‐tribe relationships in the 18th and 19th centuries, and in terms of the strands of continuity which linked together the late antique Near East and the early medieval world of the Islamic caliphate. It argues that the Arab groups discussed throughout shed new light on the very important role played by the two major empires — Rome and Sasanian Iran — in affecting concepts of identity for the Arabs, providing another way by which we can see the Muslim invasions of the 7th century as a continuation of pre‐existing processes. Finally, it suggests avenues for future study and ways, going forward, to think about the role and place of Arabs in world history.

Keywords:   Late Antiquity, continuity, change, Islam, state‐tribe relationships, Arab identity

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