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Catholic Particularity in Seventeenth-Century French Writing'Christianity is Strange'$
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Richard Parish

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199596669

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199596669.001.0001

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Particularity and Physicality

Particularity and Physicality

Chapter:
(p.36) 2 Particularity and Physicality
Source:
Catholic Particularity in Seventeenth-Century French Writing
Author(s):

Richard Parish

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199596669.003.0003

The second chapter moves on to the central Christian doctrine of the Incarnation. It considers the role of Judaism in Christian apologetics, and examines the specifics of Christ’s life, looking in that context at devotion to St Joseph and to the Virgin Mary; at the image of the spouse in its more and less orthodox formulations, with particular reference to the element of spiritual eroticism in the autobiography of St Margaret Mary; and at modes of devotional association with the Passion, notably in the sonnets of La Ceppède. It continues by considering the portrayal of early martyrs in contemporary tragedies (by Rotrou and Pierre Corneille); and concludes by assessing the impact of teaching surrounding sacraments and relics.

Keywords:   Incarnation, Virgin Mary, imagery, St Margaret Mary, eroticism, Passion, sonnets, martyr tragedies, sacraments, relics

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