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The Regulatory StateConstitutional Implications$
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Dawn Oliver, Tony Prosser, and Richard Rawlings

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199593170

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199593170.001.0001

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Auditing Regulatory Reform

Auditing Regulatory Reform

Chapter:
(p.267) 13 Auditing Regulatory Reform
Source:
The Regulatory State
Author(s):

Ed Humpherson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199593170.003.0013

This chapter considers a major phenomenon in the regulatory state, which is all too easily glossed over — the role of ‘bureaucratic regulation’ of public bodies by other public bodies. A prime concern is the instruments of the so-called ‘audit culture’ which has flourished in the UK under successive governments. The chapter gives an insider's view of the role of the National Audit Office in scrutinizing the workings of the regulatory reform agenda, with particular reference to the fashionable tools of impact assessment and risk-based evaluation. In so doing, it emphasizes the empowering of parliamentary scrutiny through reports on (lack of) value for money to the House of Commons Public Accounts Committee. It also emphasizes the importance of the work in terms of the economic footprint of regulation.

Keywords:   regulatory state, bureaucratic regulation, audit culture, National Audit Office, UK regulation, regulatory reform

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