Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Morphological AutonomyPerspectives From Romance Inflectional Morphology$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Martin Maiden, John Charles Smith, Maria Goldbach, and Marc-Olivier Hinzelin

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199589982

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199589982.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 22 October 2019

Overabundance (Multiple Forms Realizing the Same Cell): A Non‐canonical Phenomenon in Italian Verb Morphology

Overabundance (Multiple Forms Realizing the Same Cell): A Non‐canonical Phenomenon in Italian Verb Morphology

Chapter:
(p.358) 16 Overabundance (Multiple Forms Realizing the Same Cell): A Non‐canonical Phenomenon in Italian Verb Morphology
Source:
Morphological Autonomy
Author(s):

Anna M. Thornton

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199589982.003.0017

The chapter deals with overabundancy, a non‐canonical situation in which certain lexemes exhibit cell‐mates, i.e. more than one inflected form to fill one and the same cell of their paradigm (realize the same set of morpho‐syntactic features). An exhaustive set of cases of overabundancy in Italian verb inflection is described, and their relative canonicity is assessed by means of criteria of canonicity similar to those proposed by Corbett (2007a). Results show that overabundancy, like other autonomously morphological phenomena, such as morphomic distribution of stems, tends to occur in the non‐1st conjugation, and in paradigm partitions independently established for the language.

Keywords:   overabundancy, doublets, non‐canonical, non‐1st conjugation, completeness

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .