Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
From Bilateralism to Community InterestEssays in Honour of Bruno Simma$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Ulrich Fastenrath, Rudolf Geiger, Daniel-Erasmus Khan, Andreas Paulus, Sabine von Schorlemer, and Christoph Vedder

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199588817

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199588817.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 21 November 2019

Are Nuclear Weapons Really Legal? Thoughts on the Sources of International Law and a Conception of the Law imperio rationis instead of ratione imperii

Are Nuclear Weapons Really Legal? Thoughts on the Sources of International Law and a Conception of the Law imperio rationis instead of ratione imperii

Chapter:
(p.184) Are Nuclear Weapons Really Legal? Thoughts on the Sources of International Law and a Conception of the Law imperio rationis instead of ratione imperii
Source:
From Bilateralism to Community Interest
Author(s):

Daniel Thürer

Martin Zobl

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199588817.003.0014

The only way a critical observer can consider the question of nuclear weapons is to say that disarmament efforts have not gone far enough. From a legal perspective, the causes of this failure are essentially outmoded sovereignty dogmas that largely continue to influence governments' understanding of international law, and the positivist approach to sources of law associated with those dogmas. This chapter argues that a nuclear disarmament process must emerge from, and be sustained by, society itself. Government support will, of course, also be essential to the success of an initiative of this nature. A cooperative partnership between a wide range of international actors (governments, international organizations, the ICRC, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and individuals) around a common ultimate goal is thus essential, as is an approximate line of approach.

Keywords:   nuclear weapons, nuclear disarmament, international law, international organizations, non-governmental organizations

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .