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Human Tissue ResearchA European perspective on the ethical and legal challenges$
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Christian Lenk, Nils Hoppe, Katharina Beier, and Claudia Wiesemann

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199587551

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199587551.001.0001

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Beyond the dichotomy of individualism and solidarity: participation in biobank research in Sweden and Norway

Beyond the dichotomy of individualism and solidarity: participation in biobank research in Sweden and Norway

Chapter:
(p.65) Chapter 7 Beyond the dichotomy of individualism and solidarity: participation in biobank research in Sweden and Norway
Source:
Human Tissue Research
Author(s):

Katharina Beier (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199587551.003.0007

As biobank research depends on an individual's readiness to donate her bodily material alongside with disposing personal data to scientific enterprises, this chapter focuses on the arguments that are brought forward to encourage individual research contributions. In the analysis of the Swedish and Norwegian biobanks acts, the chapter aims to leave behind the dichotomy of individualism versus solidarity. The Scandinavian regulatory frameworks rather reveal a conjunction of both perspectives: the wish to enable biobank research and thereby serve the common good, and the wish for the protection of individual interests. In order to provide an explanation for this feature, the chapter highlights two concepts that reconcile these contrasting attitudes. Whilst the Swedish welfare state supports a so-called state individualism which rests on a reciprocal relationship between the state and the individual citizen, the Norwegian dugnad tradition strengthens the reciprocal assistance amongst its citizens. Both traditions can be fruitfully applied to the ethics of biobank research.

Keywords:   solidarity, individualism, common good, Swedish biobank act, Norwegian biobank act, biobank research ethics, state individualism, dugnad, Swedish welfare state

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