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Music, Health, and Wellbeing$
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Raymond MacDonald, Gunter Kreutz, and Laura Mitchell

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199586974

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199586974.001.0001

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The Brain and Positive Biological Effects in Healthy and Clinical Populations

The Brain and Positive Biological Effects in Healthy and Clinical Populations

Chapter:
Chapter 29 The Brain and Positive Biological Effects in Healthy and Clinical Populations
Source:
Music, Health, and Wellbeing
Author(s):

Stefan Koelsch

Thomas Stegemann

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199586974.003.0029

Mounting evidence indicates that making music, dancing, and even simply listening to music activates a multitude of brain structures involved in cognitive, sensorimotor, and emotional processing. It has been hypothesized that such activation has beneficial effects on psychological and physiological health, but there is still a lack of systematic high-quality research confirming such hypotheses. To lay out the basis for such research, this chapter focuses on the neural correlates of music-evoked emotions, and their health-related autonomic, endocrinological, and immunological effects. It starts with the question as to how music actually evokes an emotion, and some thoughts on the different routes through which music might evoke emotions.

Keywords:   music making, music listening, music-evoked emotions, emotional effects

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