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Music, Health, and Wellbeing$
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Raymond MacDonald, Gunter Kreutz, and Laura Mitchell

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199586974

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199586974.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 12 December 2019

Developing Social Models for Research and Practice in Music, Arts, and Health: A Case Study of Research in a Mental Health Setting

Developing Social Models for Research and Practice in Music, Arts, and Health: A Case Study of Research in a Mental Health Setting

Chapter:
(p.65) Chapter 5 Developing Social Models for Research and Practice in Music, Arts, and Health: A Case Study of Research in a Mental Health Setting
Source:
Music, Health, and Wellbeing
Author(s):

Norma Daykin

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199586974.003.0005

This chapter explores the role of music in promoting health and wellbeing, drawing on social models of health and locating music within the broad field of arts and health. It surveys some of the conceptual frameworks that might support research in addressing the social dimensions of music and arts in healthcare including perspectives on social capital and empowerment. It considers professional development issues for musicians who are engaged in promoting health and wellbeing. As artists they are not necessarily therapists and neither are they assumed to be specialists in healthcare. Their practice falls between several defined fields and professions including community music, music therapy, and community music therapy. There is an ongoing debate about the definitions and boundaries between these groupings. The chapter seeks to contribute to the debate by highlighting some of the professional issues that can arise for artists and staff in participatory arts projects. It draws on qualitative research on an arts project in a UK mental healthcare setting.

Keywords:   arts, healthcare, wellbeing, musicians, music therapy

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