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Applied Evolutionary Psychology$
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S. Craig Roberts

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199586073

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199586073.001.0001

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The evolutionary psychology of mass politics

The evolutionary psychology of mass politics

Chapter:
(p.114) (p.115) Chapter 8 The evolutionary psychology of mass politics
Source:
Applied Evolutionary Psychology
Author(s):

Michael Bang Petersen

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199586073.003.0008

A number of modern political issues mimic ancestral problems of social living. By implication, our evolved social psychology is engaged by mass politics and helps facilitate the formation of public opinion and behaviour. Yet, the contextual differences between ancestral small-scale interaction and mass politics are many in terms of scale. On the one hand, the automatic operations of our evolved psychology prompt individuals to disregard these differences: individuals effectively think about mass political issues as small-scale social problems. On other hand, in the large-scale setting of mass politics, individuals cannot rely on directly available cues but are left with cues provided by media and political elites or, when these too are absent, on internally-generated cues. In these situations, our evolved social psychology will not so much facilitate a clear choice as produce ambivalence and attitudinal inconsistencies.

Keywords:   evolutionary politics, leadership, voting, social behaviour

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