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Women, Dissent, and Anti-Slavery in Britain and America, 1790–1865$
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Elizabeth J. Clapp and Julie Roy Jeffrey

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199585489

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199585489.001.0001

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Complicating the Story: Religion and Gender in Historical Writing on British and American Anti-Slavery

Complicating the Story: Religion and Gender in Historical Writing on British and American Anti-Slavery

Chapter:
(p.20) 1 Complicating the Story: Religion and Gender in Historical Writing on British and American Anti-Slavery
Source:
Women, Dissent, and Anti-Slavery in Britain and America, 1790–1865
Author(s):

David Turley

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199585489.003.0002

This chapter traces historical writing on British and American anti-slavery through three phases encompassing writing by participants, the generations of twentieth century professional historians (including a distinct tradition of African American writing) and, most substantially, the period from the 1970s displaying the impact of the development of feminism on historical writing. It treats the themes of religion and gender both separately and together, especially in the section on feminism, as religion is represented as a major mode through which women moderated their engagement with anti-slavery. The Chapter notes both similarities and differences in the historiographical significance given to gender in relation to religion: British scholars focusing on the importance of class formation; Americans on race and female culture.

Keywords:   historical writing, anti-slavery, religion, gender, class, race, female culture, feminism, African American writing

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