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The Poor under Globalization in Asia, Latin America, and Africa$
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Machiko Nissanke and Erik Thorbecke

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199584758

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199584758.001.0001

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Asia's Labour‐driven Growth, Flying Geese Style: Types of Trade, FDI, and Institutions Matter for the Poor

Asia's Labour‐driven Growth, Flying Geese Style: Types of Trade, FDI, and Institutions Matter for the Poor

Chapter:
(p.87) 4 Asia's Labour‐driven Growth, Flying Geese Style: Types of Trade, FDI, and Institutions Matter for the Poor
Source:
The Poor under Globalization in Asia, Latin America, and Africa
Author(s):

Terutomo Ozawa

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199584758.003.0004

The notion of ‘shared growth’ was introduced by the World Bank in recognition of East Asia's rapid growth accompanied by poverty reduction. It emphasizes the criticality of pro‐poor policies and institutional set‐ups in the fast‐developing East Asian economies. The efforts of these individual countries are, however, a necessary but not sufficient condition (explanation). There is a more essential, underlying region‐wide mechanism that simultaneously promotes regionalized growth and specifically favours Asia's working mass of unskilled labour. Such an efficacious mechanism is posited in the ‘flying geese paradigm of comparative advantage recycling in labour intensive goods’. The chapter argues that a number of favourable factors have fortuitously coalesced to engender a considerably favourable condition for Asia's rapid catch‐up growth in which unskilled labour (the poor) can participate as their countries' most vital input in labour‐driven development.

Keywords:   comparative advantage, flying geese theory, growth, labour‐driven economic development, trade, poverty reduction, recycling

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