Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Poor under Globalization in Asia, Latin America, and Africa$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Machiko Nissanke and Erik Thorbecke

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199584758

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199584758.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 13 December 2019

Inequality and Poverty in Africa in an Era of Globalization: Looking Beyond Income to Health and Education

Inequality and Poverty in Africa in an Era of Globalization: Looking Beyond Income to Health and Education

Chapter:
(p.398) 13 Inequality and Poverty in Africa in an Era of Globalization: Looking Beyond Income to Health and Education
Source:
The Poor under Globalization in Asia, Latin America, and Africa
Author(s):

David E. Sahn

Stephen D. Younger (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199584758.003.0013

This chapter describes changes over the past 15–20 years in non‐income measures of well‐being—education and health—in Africa. We expected to find, as we did in Latin America, that progress in the provision of public services and the focus of public spending in the social sector would contribute to declining poverty and inequality in health and education, even in an environment of stagnant or worsening levels of income poverty. Unfortunately, our results indicate that, in the area of health, little progress is being made in terms of reducing pre‐school age‐stunting, a clear manifestation of poor overall health. Likewise, our health inequality measure showed that while there were a few instances of reduced inequality along this dimension, there was, on balance, little evidence of success in improving equality of outcomes. Similar results were found in our examination of underweight women as an indicator of general current health status of adults. With regard to education, the story is somewhat more positive. However, the overall picture gives little cause for complacency or optimism that Africa has reaped, or will soon reap the potential benefits of the process of globalization.

Keywords:   Africa, education, health, well‐being

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .