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Evolution of Emotional CommunicationFrom Sounds in Nonhuman Mammals to Speech and Music in Man$
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Eckart Altenmüller, Sabine Schmidt, and Elke Zimmermann

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199583560

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199583560.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 21 August 2019

An integrative model of brain processes for the decoding of emotional prosody

An integrative model of brain processes for the decoding of emotional prosody

Chapter:
(p.211) Chapter 13 An integrative model of brain processes for the decoding of emotional prosody
Source:
Evolution of Emotional Communication
Author(s):

Didier Grandjean

Sascha Frühholz

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199583560.003.0013

The central nervous system has developed specialized neural systems to process relevant information, including emotional information in the auditory domain. This chapter discusses the functional roles of temporal regions like the superior temporal sulcus (STS) and gyrus (STG), the amygdala and subcortical grey nuclei as well as regions in the frontal lobe like the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and inferior frontal gyri (IFG) during the processing emotional prosody. The involvement of these different regions in the processing of the different steps of auditory information processing however is still unclear. A model is proposed based on results of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies and studies using electroencephalographic recordings (EEG) as well as intracranial local field potentials (LFPs). The functional coupling between different brain areas, such as the STS, the IFG, the amygdala, and OFC regions, will be discussed in the light of recent empirical findings.

Keywords:   voice, emotion, emotional prosody, vocal expressions, attentional focus, STS/STG, amygdala, OFC, interindividual differences

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