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Ulster Since 1600Politics, Economy, and Society$
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Liam Kennedy and Philip Ollerenshaw

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199583119

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199583119.001.0001

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Religion and Society, 1600–1914

Religion and Society, 1600–1914

Chapter:
(p.74) 5 Religion and Society, 1600–1914
Source:
Ulster Since 1600
Author(s):

Sean Connolly

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199583119.003.0006

The Reformation constitutes one of the great, if ragged’ dividing lines in modern European history. Though affecting Ireland later than many European societies, it was clear by the 1630s that the distinction between natives and colonists, between protestants and Catholics had assumed an enduring quality. This chapter traces a range of reform tendencies within the major churches, as religious leaders and elders sought to impose greater discipline on recalcitrant clergymen and their sometimes unruly congregations. In terms of Catholicism this culminated in the Devotional Revolution of the second half of the nineteenth century. Evangelical fervour marked the Anglican tradition from the late eighteenth century onwards, while Presbyterianism found itself subject to periodic secessions on the grounds of theological orthodoxy. If anything, these revivals sharpened religious animosities in nineteenth-century Ireland.

Keywords:   reformation, religion, church, evangelical revival, devotional revolution, theology, clergy, sectarianism, colonist

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