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The Analogy of GraceKarl Barth's Moral Theology$
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Gerald McKenny

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199582679

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199582679.001.0001

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Dogmatics and Ethics

Dogmatics and Ethics

Chapter:
(p.122) 3 Dogmatics and Ethics
Source:
The Analogy of Grace
Author(s):

Gerald Mckenny

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199582679.003.0004

If ethics is to attest God's grace to humanity (the ethics of human confirmation of divine grace) rather than betraying it (the ethics of human self‐assertion), then it must be carried out as the investigation of human life and conduct from the standpoint of the revelation of the Word and work of God's grace in Jesus Christ and thus as a part of dogmatics. This approach differs from most contemporary approaches in moral theology, which ground ethics either in reason or nature in relative independence from dogmatics or in the life of the church. This chapter reconstructs Barth's position in response to criticisms that it is remote from the concrete contexts in which moral issues arise, that it does violence to ethics, and that it accords no legitimacy to nontheological approaches to ethics.

Keywords:   dogmatics, ethics, moral philosophy, Kantian ethics, command of God, grace

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