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Imprison'd WranglersThe Rhetorical Culture of the House of Commons 1760-1800$
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Christopher Reid

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199581092

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199581092.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 Introduction
Source:
Imprison'd Wranglers
Author(s):

Christopher Reid

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199581092.003.0001

This chapter offers an introduction to parliamentary speaking in the later eighteenth century, a period in which Parliament extended its domestic authority and stood at the centre of an imperial state. The chapter discusses the increasing availability of parliamentary information, including the newspaper publication of debates and the emergence of new forms of writing about the business of the House. Using the correspondence of William Cowper as an example, it considers how these developments changed perceptions of Parliament and the public's engagement with parliamentary politics. The chapter concludes with a consideration of the methodological issues raised by the book, including the extent and quality of the extant sources, the challenge of reconstructing rhetorical performances and events, and the question of oratory's place within a general history of Parliament.

Keywords:   parliamentary history, parliamentary reporting, information, newspapers, rhetorical event, William Cowper

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