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Foreign Aid for DevelopmentIssues, Challenges, and the New Agenda$
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George Mavrotas

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199580934

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199580934.001.0001

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New Aid Modalities and Reporting Support for Child Rights: Lessons from Assessing Aid for Basic Social Services 1

New Aid Modalities and Reporting Support for Child Rights: Lessons from Assessing Aid for Basic Social Services 1

Chapter:
(p.273) 12 New Aid Modalities and Reporting Support for Child Rights: Lessons from Assessing Aid for Basic Social Services1
Source:
Foreign Aid for Development
Author(s):

Eva Jespersen

Julia Benn

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199580934.003.0012

The chapter reflects on the potential of the OECD-DAC creditor reporting system to systematically capture flows of official development assistance (ODA) in support of realizing children's rights. The growth in modalities for delivering aid, including sector programmes, sector wide approaches (SWAPs), dedicated funds which encompass public-private partnerships such as the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, as well as the OECD-DAC commitment to promote harmonization and simplification in the provision of ODA and promote government ownership through general budget support raises challenges to assessing ODA for children. The question also needs asking whether singling out and measuring direct assistance to children is meaningful. The chapter goes on to analyse ODA trends for basic social services. It shows that ODA to basic social services as a proportion of total ODA has been on an upward trend during the 1995–2004 period, particularly since 2000, the year in which the Millennium Summit set out the Millennium Agenda including the Millennium Development Goals. It shows that ODA to combat HIV and address AIDS infections has increased rapidly since 2000, but does not alone explain the overall increased aid share for basic social services. The analysis further confirms that social sector programmes and SWAPs are on the rise but still account only for a small portion of total ODA to basic social services although a number of such programmes are targeted specifically to basic services.

Keywords:   ODA, basic social services, sector programmes, SWAPs

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