Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Southern Engines of Global Growth$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Amelia U. Santos-Paulino and Guanghua Wan

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199580606

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199580606.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 14 November 2019

China, India, Brazil, and South Africa in the World Economy: Engines of Growth?

China, India, Brazil, and South Africa in the World Economy: Engines of Growth?

Chapter:
(p.9) 2 China, India, Brazil, and South Africa in the World Economy: Engines of Growth?
Source:
Southern Engines of Global Growth
Author(s):

Deepak Nayyar

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199580606.003.0002

This chapter attempts to analyse the economic implications of the rise of China, India, Brazil, and South Africa (CIBS) for developing countries, situated in the wider context of the world economy. It examines the possible impact of their rapid growth on industrialized countries and developing countries, which could be complementary or competitive and, on balance, positive or negative. In doing so, it considers the main channels of transmission, to focus on international trade, investment, finance, and migration. The essential question is whether, in times to come, these four countries could be the new engines of growth for the world economy. The answer is that rapid growth in China already supports growth elsewhere—so far, primarily, as a market for exports, while India and Brazil have the potential to provide similar support, but South Africa does not yet exhibit such potential. In future, these countries could also provide resources for investment and technologies for productivity. The transformation and catch-up could span half a century or longer. Even so, rapid growth in these large emerging economies is already beginning to change the balance of economic power in the world.

Keywords:   Brazil, China, development, finance, growth, India, investment, South Africa, trade

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .