Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Epilepsy and Memory$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Adam Zeman, Narinder Kapur, and Marilyn Jones-Gotman

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199580286

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199580286.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 22 November 2019

Effects of amygdalohippocampectomy versus corticoamygdalohippocampectomy on memory and nonmemory cognitive functions

Effects of amygdalohippocampectomy versus corticoamygdalohippocampectomy on memory and nonmemory cognitive functions

Chapter:
(p.411) Chapter 24 Effects of amygdalohippocampectomy versus corticoamygdalohippocampectomy on memory and nonmemory cognitive functions
Source:
Epilepsy and Memory
Author(s):

Sarah J. Banks

Marilyn Jones-Gotman

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199580286.003.0024

In recent years, selective resection from medial temporal lobe (TL) structures has become a preferred approach at many centres that offer surgery as a treatment for intractable TL epilepsy. This operation — selective amygdalohippocampectomy (SAH) — differs from the traditional TL surgery (corticoamygdalohippocampectomy; CAH) in that it spares temporal neocortex, which is removed in addition to amygdala and hippocampus in CAH. Because SAH is a smaller resection, it has been expected to cause less cognitive deficit, but as the targeted structures in SAH are critical for memory, this operation could result in important memory deficits. On the other hand, one might expect some sparing of certain nonmemory skills mediated by temporal neocortex. A growing number of studies have attempted to determine whether CAH and SAH differ in cognitive outcome, most focusing on memory outcome. This chapter reviews that literature and present results from investigations on this issue.

Keywords:   medial temporal lobe, epilepsy, selective amygdalohippocampectomy, corticoamygdalohippocampectomy

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .