Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Taking Morality SeriouslyA Defense of Robust Realism$

David Enoch

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199579969

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199579969.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use.  Subscriber: null; date: 17 September 2019

(p.287) Index

(p.287) Index

Source:
Taking Morality Seriously
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Page references in bold indicate a substantive discussion of a thinker’s views or arguments (rather than more incidental references).

a priori knowledge37, 59 n. 24, 91, 104, 105, 127 n. 87, 154, 176, 214 n. 75
acceptance78 n. 69, 114
and fictionalism114
acting for a reason18 n. 4, 19, 21–2, 28 n. 23, 73–5, 86–8, 113, 180, 218, 256
acting for a specific reason218–37, 247, 259, 265, 269, 271
as the agent’s reason22 n. 11, 223–4
and implicit belief226
and normative belief226
aesthetics250 n. 59, 268 n. 1
ampliative inference58–9, 189 n. 12
Analytic Utilitarianism46, 47 n. 60
anomalous monism109 n. 29
Aquinas, T.191 n. 19
Attfield, R.211 n. 67
Audi, R.52 n. 8, 153 n. 5
autonomy240 n., 264 n. 112
of the normative107–8
Ayer, A. J.3, 202 n.
Baker, A.92 n.
Baras, D.142 n. 23
basic belief forming methods57–67, 175 n. 55
their justification and reliability64–7
vindicating them59–60
a pragmatic criterion for60–7
Beardsman, S.74 n. 58
Bedke, M. S.162 n. 21, 163 n. 23
beliefsee implicit beliefs see reasons
belief-forming methods
basic, default reasonable58, 59, 66
inferential58
non-inferential58 see also basic belief-forming methods
Bennett, K.101 n. 3, 102 n. 4, 136 n. 3, 137, 141 n. 17
Bennigson, T.207 n. 57, 209 n. 61, 212 n. 70
Berkeley, G.41
Bishop Butler263
Blackburn, S.3 n. 2, 19, 35–8, 40 n. 45, 52 n. 8, 80 n. 74, 122, 129 n. 97, 137, 140–9, 207 n. 57, 256 n. 85
Block, N.177 n. 58, 179 n. 62
Bloomfield, P.6, 40 n. 45, 80, 173 n.
Boghossian, P.8 n. 15, 59 n. 29, n. 30, 108 n. 27, 210 n. 62
Bond, E. J.75 n., 76 n. 64, 203 n. 52
Bonjour, L.186 n. 5
Boyd, R. N.6, 103 n. 10, 177 n. 59, 191 n. 19, 200 n. 43, 252 n. 71
Brandt, R.192 n. 21, 214 n. 75
Brink, D. O.5 n. 7, n. 8, 6, 51 n. 2, 52 n. 3, n. 6, n. 8, 68 n. 46, 153 n. 3, n. 4, 162, 191 n. 19, 192 n. 20, 195 n. 29, 199 n. 39, 210 n. 63, 213 n. 72, 238 n. 36, 248 n. 52, 250 n. 61, 251 n. 65, 252 n. 71
Broome, J.94 n. 8, 238 n. 37, 241 n. 44, 259 n. 89
Brown, C.138 n. 6, 139–40
Burgess, J.115 n. 53, 254 n. 77
Caricaturized Subjectivism
characterized16, 24
its ability to accommodate moral disagreement26 n. 19
reductio argument against25–7
generalizing the argument against27–40
Carnap, R.125 n. 83, 128 n. 90, n. 91
Carrol, L.240 n. 1
Cassam, Q.36 n. 34, 128 n. 90
causality
appropriate causal role222–7, 230, 230 n. 26, 231, 233–5, 235 n., 236–7, 241, 248, 250 n. 62, 259, 264
inertness and efficacy6 n. 10, 7, 54 n. 12, 124, 125 n. 81, 157, 159, 159 n. 14, 160, 160 n. 16, 162, 177, 219–21, 233, 236
Cavell, S.122
Chang, R.203 n. 51
Christy, S.110 n. 33, 116 n. 58
Clarke, S.80 n. 73
Cognitive Command209 n. 60, 212 n. 70
Cohen, S.119 n. 62
coherentism153, 163 n. 23
Colyvan, M.55 n. 13, 67 n. 44, 68–9, 81, 114 n. 52
conceptual role semantics (CRS)179–83
conservative extension44–9, 114, 118, 123, 123 n. 75
(p.288) constitutivism29, 30, 34 n., 39, 40, 82, 85, 201, 246, 262
and the shmagency challenge29 n. 26, 62 n. 33, 82, 126 n. 85, 201, 239 n. 42, 245, 246, 263
constructive empiricism113 n. 48, 114
and conservative extensions114
and fictionalism114
and indispensability114 n. 52
constructivism82, 240 n.
Copp, D.28 n. 22, 52 n. 8, 103 n. 13, 120 n. 66, 157 n. 13, 165 n. 29, 166 n. 34, 167 n. 36, 168 n. 36, 172–4, 252 n. 70, 253 n. 74, 254 n. 79
Cornell Realism6, 52 n. 6, 104,
and moral disagreement104
and the moral twin earth argument104
counter-induction59, 124 n. 79
counter-reasons113, 124–7
counterfactual robustness172–4
Crimmins, M.227 n. 17
Cullity, G.261 n. 99
Cuneo, T.6 n. 10, 7, 103 n. 13, 110 n. 33, 116 n. 58
Dancy, J.22 n. 10, 73 n. 53, 108 n. 27, 136 n. 3, 145 n. 30, 160 n. 17, 203 n. 52, 218 n., 219 n. 3, 222 n., 223, 225 n. 13, 232–3, 249 n. 56, 260 n. 92
Darwall, S. L.4 n. 4, 61 n. 32, 73 n. 55, 75 n. 60, 108 n. 27, 149 n. 43, 192 n. 19, 220 n. 44, 222 n., 240 n. 43, 248 n. 52, 249 n. 57, n. 58, 254 n. 76, 255 n. 82, 263–5
Darwinian dilemma151, 163–5, 167 n., 175 n.
Davidson, D.199 n. 38
deflationism about reference178
Deigh, J.229 n. 22
deliberation53 n. 9
and commitment to normative truths74–6
and desires75–6
and fictionalism111, 113–14
and implicit belief or commitment74
intrinsic indispensability of50, 55–6, 66, 67, 70–1, 76 n. 62, 83
phenomenologically characterized72–3
distinguished from picking73 see also indispensability
Descartes, R.4
desires
understood de dicto, de re255
and deliberation75–6, 63, 64
and the guise of the good76 n. 61, 254
and motivation218–19, 223, 225, 226 n. 14, 230, 234, 235, 249, 254, 259, 262
DiPaolo, J.147 n.
disagreement
and cognitive command209 n. 60
and the epistemic challenge to realism213–14, 270
and inference to the best explanation189–95
factual20–4, 29, 32, 33, 39, 111, 190–1, 121 n. 12, 202
moral disagreement
and Cornell Realism104
and deductive arguments202–13
and fictionalism111–12
and impartiality23–48, 87, 90, 96, 190, 191 n. 7, 192 n. 20
inter-social or inter-cultural23, 29
and intolerance26 n. 18, 186–7
metaethical (as opposed to moral) disagreement188, 215–16
and moral twin earth104, 199
as a problem for realism90, 185–96
and the “self-evidence” argument187
and semantic access198–200
Nagelian or egalitarian solution to17, 19–23
political significance of22
about preferences17–20, 24–38
among rational people207
explained by reference to self-interest192–4
dogmatism paradox90 n. 2
Donagan, A.108 n. 27
Dorr, C.5 n. 8, 26 n. 19
Dreier, J.28 n. 21, 41 n. 48, 45 n., 47 n. 63, 48 n., 142 n. 22, 147 n., 148 n. 37, 149 n. 40, n. 42
Dworkin, R.7, 34 n., 47 n. 62, 52 n. 4, 53 n. 9, 121–2, 123 n. 76, 127–8, 129 n. 97, n. 98, 131 n. 102, 215 n. 77
easy knowledge119, 121, 175 n. 55
Eklund, M.109 n. 30, 110 n. 31, n. 32, 115 n.
Elster, J.233 n. 30
engaging our will
as a challenge for Robust Realism217, 237–9
disambiguated as between normative and motivational238–9
epistemic access83, 92, 94, 134, 174
and disagreement213–14
and the epistemic challenge152–3
epistemic responsibility20, 89, 153
epistemic and theoretical virtues153–5
the epistemological challenge
and access152–3
characterized158–60
coping with it165–75
and the faculty of rational intuition162
and Gettier cases156–7
initially presented151–2
and justification153–5, 160
and knowledge156–7
to mathematical Platonism155 n. 9, 158–9
and reliability156, 160
(p.289) Erdur, M.47 n. 63
error theory
argued against39, 67, 97–8, 116–21
and the commitments of the target discourse81, 115
about counter-reasons125
and deliberation79
and eliminativism (or abolitionism)39
and fictionalism39, 115–21
global and local81–2, 115
and how to proceed116 n. 58
about mathematical objects42–3, 118
and neutrality42–3
non-eliminitavistsee error theory and fictionalism
and one person’s modus ponens being another person’s modus tollens118
and question-begging39, 117–20
Simple Moorean Argument against117–21
error theory about mathematics118
typical argument for115–16
Ewing, A. C.121 n. 69
explanatory requirement or constraint, the51–6, 84, 135, 140, 232, 233 n. 30
distinguished from the minimal parsimony requirement54
expressivism
and the challenge from IMPARTIALITY35–8
and deliberation79 n. 72, 80–1
expressivist quasi-realism distinguished from realism36
and objectivity38 n. 44, 40
and quasi-realism35–8
and relativism40
external justification122–4, 127
undecidability of129
unintelligibility of127–8
externalism14, 153, 161, 201 n. 47, 247, 250, 256 n. 84, 260, 262 n. 103
Evans, M.8 n. 16
evolution, see Darwinian challenge
facts
explanatorily indispensable54, 80
moral or normative1–9, 12–13, 37–9, 50–5, 80, 89, 92, 100–10, 127 n. 87, 135, 140–1, 149, 160, 174, 189, 197, 199 n. 39, 214, 220
natural, non-normative4–5, 20, 33, 39, 47, 51, 90, 101–4, 108, 109 n. 29, 141, 142 n. 21, 149, 160, 191, 199 n. 39, 239, 241
faculty of rational intuition151, 156, 162
Fantl, J.17 n. 2, 19 n., 25 n. 17, 41 n. 48, 45 n.
Feigl, H.60 n. 31
Ferrero, L.29 n. 26, 82 n. 78, 201 n. 48
fictionalism
and acceptance114
and constructive empiricism114
and deliberation111–14
and different ways of understanding existence124
and error theorysee error theory and factionalism
force-fictionalism110 n. 31
hermeneutic fictionalism109
and impartiality111–12
and an in-the-fiction operator110
and intrinsic pretense113 n. 46
and make-believe112 n. 38
meaning-fictionalism113 n. 46
meta-fictionalism110 n. 31
and metaphor112 n. 43
and multiple fictions112–13
and naturalist metaphysics111
and necessary fictions113
non-error-theoretic fictionalism109–15
object-fictionalism110 n. 31
and objectivity39, 111–12
and the oracle argument115 n. 53
and pretense110 n. 31
and question-begging114–15
reflexive fictionalism110 n. 31
sensitivity of the content of the fiction to it being a fiction115
Field, H.3, 42, 44 n. 54, 49, 55 n. 13, 58 n. 20, 67–8, 116 n. 54, 118, 123, 158, 159
Fine, K.102 n. 5, 105 n. 18, 128, 129 n. 96, 132 n. 106, 146 n. 34
Finlay, S.6 n. 9, 35 n. 32, 111 n. 36, 112 n. 40, 155 n. 9, 174 n. 51, n. 52
Fitzpatrick, W. J.7, 8 n. 15, 37 n. 42, 53 n. 9, 108 n. 27, 139 n. 10, 239 n. 41, 240 n., 241 n. 44, 246 n. 49, 263 n. 108
Foot, P.6, 93, 95 n. 12
foundationalism153
Frankena, W. K.238 n. 39
Frege-Geach problem, the9–10
Fumerton, R.59 n. 25
Gampel, E. H.104 n. 17
Garner, R.116 n. 58
Gaut, B.261 n. 99
Gert, J.192 n. 20
Gettier, E.156, 157, 157 n. 11, 174
Gewirth, A.47 n. 61, 130 n. 98
Gibbard, A.3, 6, 37 n. 38, n. 42, 40 n., 78, 78 n. 67, 79 n. 72, 80 n. 74, 98, 108 n. 27, n. 28, 129 n. 97, 149 n. 43, 163 n. 23, 164 n. 26, 168 n. 37, 169, 170 n. 40, 175, 192 n. 19, 251 n. 63, 256 n. 84
Goldman, A. H.207 n. 57
(p.290) Gowans, C. W.185 n. 1, 188 n. 7, 191 n. 19, 194 n. 26, 195 n. 29, n. 30, 196 n. 31, 212 n. 70, 213 n. 73.
Graham, P.77 n. 66
Greco, D.21 n. 9
Greenspan, P. S.256 n. 85, 257 n. 86
Grice, P.54 n. 12
Grotius, H.254 n. 76
Halbertal, M.23 n. 14, 34 n. 31
Hampton, J.94 n. 9
Hare, R. M.104
Harman, G.51–6, 58 n. 21, 77 n. 65, 200, 201, 262 n. 102
Harman’s Challenge50–6, 84, 135
and self-defeat:52
Heathwood, C.108 n. 27, 263 n. 107
Heuer, U.218 n., 232 n.
Hieronymi, P.223 n.
Horgan, T.38 n. 43, 40 n., 104, 142 n. 24, 143 n. 26, 199 n. 39
Horwich, P.178 n.
Huemer, M.7, 121 n. 69, 172 n. 47
Hume, D.
Hume’s Dictum146 n. 31, 147 n.
rejected147–8
and supervenience147
and general supervenience149
Humeanism
in the theory of motivation, or Humean psychology37, 218, 236, 248–9, 259, 263
in the theory of normativity35, 95 n. 13, 128 n. 89, 218
Hurley, S. L.144 n., 192 n. 19
Hursthouse, R.6 n. 11
Hussain, N.37 n. 41
Hypotheticalism95 n. 13, 260 n. 97
Impartiality
and the argument against Caricaturized Subjectivism24–7, 270
and disagreement about facts20–3
and disagreement about preferences17–20
and expressivism35–8
and fictionalism111, 114–15
introduced17–19
and moral disagreement23–24
and its implications for the neutrality of metaethical discoursesee neutrality
and objectivity40
officially stated19
and response-dependence theories27–35
implicit belief
and acting for a specific reason226–30
and commitment69–70, 74, 76–7
indispensability
deliberative indispensability and morality88, 90–2, 97–9
enabling indispensability68
explanatory50, 54–7, 66–9, 76 n. 62
indispensability argument
in the philosophy of mathematics67
as an argument for Robust Realism55–84, 270
and wishful thinking56
instrumental indispensability51, 67–70
criterion for instrumental indispensability to a project stated69
criterion for instrumental indispensability to a theory stated68
and deliberation71–83
intrinsic indispensability51, 67–70
and deliberation50, 55–6, 60, 66–7, 70–1, 76 n. 62
indispensability arguments and transcendental arguments79 n. 71
inference to the best explanation (IBE)54, 189 n. 12
and the absence-of-method argument against moral realism202–6
and indispensability55, 60, 63, 67, 70, 74–5, 77, 270
as allowing inference from disagreement to the denial of moral realism187–96
and loveliness:58–9, 66 n. 43, 69
internalism
and the amoralist wars250–2
arguments for263–5
different kinds of248
existence internalism200, 259–66, 271
and disagreement200–2
and autonomy240 n. 43
characterized259
and idealization260–261
mitigated260–1
as inconsistent with Robust Realism261
and the Sufficiently Bad Bad-Guy example261–2
and Sheer Queerness263
and explaining correlations252–6
judgment internalism
characterized247–9, 251
Michael Smith’s argument for255
mitigated180, 249, 251–2
Really Strong
characterized249–250
rejected250
Refuted251
Wedgwood’s version of18
and the refusal to distinguish between motivation and normativity240
(p.291) and the semantic–pragmatic distinction254 n. 79
tracking internalism249, 250, 260–1
intolerance26 n. 18, 186–7
Jackson, F.109 n. 29, 137–40, 158 n. 6, n. 8, 140 n. 15, 256 n. 84
Johnston, M.30 n. 28, 36 n. 35, 108 n. 27, 144 n. 29
Joyce, R.93 n. 6, 97 n. 16, 110 n. 31, 128 n. 91, 161 n. 19, 164 n. 26
just-too-different intuition4, 80–1, 100, 105–109, 270
Kalderon, M. E.21 n. 8, 110 n. 33
Kant, I., Kantian59 n. 24, 76, 82, 240 n. 43, 254 n. 76, 262
Kim, J.137 n. 5, 140 n. 16, 203 n. 52
Kitcher, P.59 n. 24
Klagge, J.149 n. 43
Kolodny, N.94 n. 8
Kolnai, A.73 n. 55, 75 n.
Korsgaard, C. M.2, 53 n. 9, 56 n. 17, 80 n. 73, 201 n. 47, 220 n. 6, 229 n. 22, n. 25, 237 n., 239–41, 242, 246, 260 n. 93, 261 n. 99
Kramer, M. H.7, 49 n. 66, 129 n. 97, n. 98, 131 n. 102, 144 n.
Kripke, S.141
Ku, J.256 n. 84
Leibniz, G. W.59 n. 24
Leiter, B.52 n. 7, n. 8, 128 n. 91, 130 n. 100
Lenman, J.231 n. 28
Lewis, D.14 n. 20, 28 n. 20, 57 n. 18, 128 n. 95, 157 n. 12, 166 n. 32, 210 n. 65, 239, 256, 257–8, 270 n. 4
Lewis, S.14 n. 20
Liggins, D.157 n. 12
Lillehammer, H.112 n. 42, 207 n. 57, 211 n. 67
Lipton, P.58, 66 n. 43
Loeb, D.192 n. 19, 194 n. 26, 199 n. 39, 214 n. 75
Lycan, W. G.51 n. 2, 52 n. 8, n. 9, 58 n. 21, n. 22, 66 n. 41, n. 43
Mackie, J. L.3, 42–3, 116 n. 56, 131 n. 103, 134–6, 151 n., 188 n. 7, 190 n. 14, 191, 193, 202 n. 50, 239 n. 40
McDowell, J.30 n. 29, 37 n. 40, 52 n. 8, 53 n. 9, 122
McGinn, C.10 n. 19, 52 n. 5, 56 n. 16, 108 n. 27, 176 n. 56
McLaughlin, B.101 n. 3, 102 n. 4, 136 n. 3, 137, 141 n. 17
McPherson, T.20 n. 7, 21 n. 9, 55 n. 15, 117 n., 119 n. 60, 121 n. 69, 122 n. 74, 124 n. 79, 125, 129 n. 98, 130 n. 100, 141 n. 18, 147, 148 n. 37, 150
Majors, B.102 n. 4, 138 n. 7, 139 n. 10
Manley, D.121 n. 71
metaethics and metanormativity2, 88
metaphysics
deflationism about121 n. 71
metaphysical nonchalancesee quietism
and its relation to objectivity41
Miller, A.6
Milo, R.3 n. 3
mistakes in action224, 231
factual224, 231
introspective231
normative224
Moody-Adams, M. M.190 n. 15, 210 n. 62
Moore, G. E.8, 100 n., 101 n. 1, 103 n. 11, 108 n. 26, 117–21
Moore, M. S.52 n. 8, 212 n. 69
Moorean arguments, see simple Moorean arguments
moral explanations51–2
Moran, R.222 n.
moral rationalism86, 243, 248
argued for96–7
moral twin earth argument96 n. 14
and disagreement104, 105, 199 n. 39
morality
and normativity2, 86–98
and reasons for action86, 96–7
Morgenbesser, S.73 n. 55, 264 n. 111
motivation
as a problem for Robust Realism89–95, 136, 217–66 see also internalism
Nagel, T.7, 18, 22 n. 12, 34 n., 52 n. 3, n. 4, 53 n. 9, 56 n. 17, 63 n. 36, 73 n. 53, 75 n., 76 n. 64, 106 n. 24, 122, 128 n. 95, 129 n. 97, 131 n. 102, 132 n. 104, 159 n. 15, 164 n. 28, 170 n. 41, 186 n. 4, 193 n. 23, n. 24, 198 n. 26, 203 n. 52, 249 n. 55, 258 n., 259 n. 89
naturalism4, 6, 7, 12, 53, 89, 96–8
and the characterization of the natural102–3
characterized101
and fictionalism111
and the IMPARTIALITY argument39–40
and the just-too-different intuitionsee just-too-different intuition
and ontological dependence102 n. 4
as an ontological thesis135
and physicalism102 n. 8
and supervenience101 n. 2, n. 3, 102 n. 4, 103 n. 3 see also reduction neo-Moorean epistemology 120–1
(p.292) neutrality41–9
and conservative extension44–9
and error theory42–3, 49
metaehical17, 25, 27, 28 n. 21, 40 n., 41–9
Newcomb’s Problem89, 90
and IMPARTIALITY87
the No Explanatory Role Thesis51–2
Nolan, D.112 n. 39, 116 n. 58
nominalism5, 68
normativity
characterized1–3
and moralitysee morality and normativity
normative constraint, the232
“the normative question”242
normativity of the intentional, the7, 10 n. 18, 181–2, 182 n. 68, n. 69
and the implications of objectivity86–8
objectivity
and agent-independence3
and categorical reasons95
characterized40
and its explanatory power in moral debate32–4
and fictionalism111–13
and IMPARTIALITY40–1
initially characterized3
and observer-independence3
Oddie, G.7, 8 n. 15, 10 n. 18, 101 n. 3, 159 n. 14, 160 n. 16, 252 n. 70
Olson, J.55 n. 15, 93 n. 7, 116 n. 58, 117 n., 120 n. 66, 136 n. 2, 142 n. 23, 149 n. 41, 170 n. 42, 171 n. 43, 223 n.
ontological commitment5, 7, 11–12, 36, 50, 53–7, 67–71, 74–7, 92, 100–1, 111, 116, 122, 124, 132–4, 194
ontological parsimony53–4, 91–3, 139
Minimal Parsimony Requirement54, 56
and queerness135
distinguished from the explanatory requirement54
violating parsimony as a price91, 108
Open Question Argument100 n., 108 n. 26
overridingness of morality97, 244
Parfit, D.2 n., 7, 10 n. 19, 74 n. 58, 104 n. 14, 105 n. 19, 108 n.27, 122, 125 n. 82, 127 n. 87, n. 88, 139 n. 10, 162 n. 23, 171 n. 44, 175 n. 54, 192 n. 20, 207 n. 57, 211 n. 67, 226 n. 14, 238 n. 38, n. 39, 240, 244 n., 248 n. 52, 259 n. 91, 263 n. 108, n. 109, 265 n., 270 n. 3
Peacocke, C.59 n. 29
Pettit, P.75 n. 60, 76 n. 63, 109 n. 29, 138 n. 8, 222 n. 256 n. 84
philosophical methodology14–15, 53–4, 267
picking73–5, 78, 113
distinguished from deliberating73–5
Plantinga, A.139 n. 11
Plato, Plato’s heaven, Platonism8, 30, 32, 36, 49, 70, 80, 89, 92, 115, 116, 122–4, 155 n. 9, 158, 159, 176, 178, 181–3, 211 n. 68, 217, 219, 221, 236, 239, 241, 249 n. 58, 237
Platts, M.53 n. 9, 56 n. 17, 135, 136, 150
practical inference179–80
practical reason180 n., 187, 217, 229 n. 25, 237–41, 248
practicality237–41
pre-established harmony13, 168–71, 175 n. 54, 183
preferences18–19, 20, 22–4, 270
and Caricaturized Subjectivism25–37, 48
disagreement grounded in, see disagreement
Prichard, H. A.129 n. 96
Pritchard, D.121 n. 68
projects
rationally non-optional60–2, 63–83
indispensablity for50, 55, 63–83
Pryor, J.121 n. 68, 161 n. 18
Putnam, H.52 n. 5, 56 n. 16, 70, 122
quasi-externalism201 n. 47, 262 n. 103
queerness12, 54 n. 12, 79 n. 72, 89, 97, 116, 27 n. 87, 134–6, 141, 150, 263, 268
quietism12, 47, 82, 121–33
methodological quietism129 n. 96
and the no-vantage-point intuition122
and self-defeat131
Scanlon’s quietism122–7
and counter-normative discourse124
as notational variant of fictionalism124
and undecidability129
Quine, W. V. O.70, 132 n. 105
Quinn, W.52 n. 5, n. 8, 226 n. 14, 231 n. 27
Rachels, J.190 n. 15, n. 16
Railton, P.51 n. 2, 52 n. 8, 73 n. 55, 108 n. 27, 140 n. 16, 149 n. 43, 157 n. 13, 188 n. 8, 192 n. 19, 207 n. 58, 250 n. 59, 252 n. 71, 254 n. 77, 265 n.
Rasmussen, S. A.36 n. 34
rational intuitionism8, 238, 250 n. 58
Rawls, J.22 n. 12, 24 n. 8, 238, 250 n. 58, 252 n. 72, 254 n. 76, 258 n.
Raz, J.22 n. 10, n. 12, 94 n. 8, 122 n. 73, 136 n. 3, 185 n. 2, 222 n., 225 n. 12
realism
antirealism4, 36, 50, 54 n. 11, 94, 131, 153 n. 3, 156, 190–6, 203–6, 208, 212, 215
characterized3
minimal3
Moorean8 see also Robust Realism
(p.293) reasons
agent’s reason221–5, 232–3
to believe20, 50–2, 55–7, 69, 77, 92, 130 n. 99, 199, 240 n.
categorical85, 93–8
and objectivity95
hypothetical93–8
and response-dependence95
to be moral242–4 see also why-be-moral skepticism
motivating22 n. 11, 89, 220–6, 232, 234, 241, 247, 264
normative2 n., 22 n. 11, 35 n. 32, 76 n., 82–3, 63, 89, 93, 123, 125 n. 82, 218–26, 231–9, 241–2, 247
practical180, 237, 238 n. 37, 240 n., 241, 259 n. 89
theoretical237–8, 240 n., 241
reduction
a priori and a posteriori104
difficulties arguing for irreducibility105
and indispensability108–9
and the just-too-different intuition100
and the nothing over and above relation101
objectivist naturalist reduction12, 39, 81–2, 85, 95 n. 13, 97, 100–9, 133, 270
Schroeder on reduction105–8
token-token identity and reduction109 n. 29
Regan, D. H.53 n. 9
Reichenbach, H.62 n. 34, 64 n.
Reid, T.192 n. 21
relativism3, 188, 200
and constitutivist theories29, 40 n. 45
and expressivism or noncognitivism40 n.
social relativist positions29
response-dependence4, 16, 95, 99, 112 n. 40, 160, 177
and idealization82, 160 n. 17
and IMPARTIALITY27–35, 38
a no-priority version of30
and objectivity40
Restall, G.112 n. 39, 116 n. 58
Reynolds, S. L.112 n. 38
Ridge, M.37 n. 41, 103 n. 13, 144 n., 147 n., 149
Robust Realism
and the argument from objectivity’s implications30, 32–3, 39
characterized3–8
and the causal efficacy of normative properties6–7 see also causality
compared to other realist views6–7
and engaging our will237–266
initially characterized1
and irreducibility4
metaethical vs. metanormative2–3
and metaphysical nonchalance5, 7 see also quietism
and metaphysics100–50
and the moral skeptic4–5
and motivation, discussion summarized265
and objectivity3
and ontological commitment5 see also ontological commitment
not committed to overridingness244
and practical reason237–66
and sensitivity to circumstances4
taking-morality-seriously motivation for8
the term “Robust Realism”8
Rorty, R.122
Rosati, C. S.53 n. 9, 108 n. 26, 201 n. 47, 263 n. 107, 264 n. 110, n. 112, 265 n.
Rosen, G.3, 17 n. 1, 36 n. 35, 37 n. 39, 115 n., 186 n. 5, 210 n. 64
Sayre-McCord, G.3, 51 n. 2, 52 n. 4, n. 8, 53 n. 9, 71 n. 52, 153 n. 3, n. 4, 154 n. 6, 251
Scanlon, T. M.7, 108 n. 27, 113 n. 46, 122–7, 128 n. 90, 129 n. 97, 131 n. 102, 144 n., 153 n. 3, 162, 210 n. 63, 226 n. 14, 231 n. 27, 252 n. 72, 258 n.
Schechter, J. B.57 n. 19, 59 n. 26, 62 n. 35, 64 n., 65 n. 39, 77 n. 66, 176 n. 56, 189 n. 12, 212 n. 71
Schiffer, S.178 n. 61, 192 n. 20, 207 n. 57, 214 n. 75, 216 n. 80
Schmitt, J.148 n. 36
Schneewind, J. B.188 n. 7
Schroeder, M.9 n., 22 n. 10, 76 n. 63, 94 n. 8, 95 n. 13, 103 n. 9, 105–8, 148 n. 36, 221 n. 7, 222 n., 225 n. 14, 231 n. 27, 233 n. 30, 235 n., 251 n. 67, 260 n. 97, 262 n. 104, 263, 266
Scott, R. B. Jr.109 n. 29
Seabright, P.198 n. 36
self–evidence191 n. 21
lack of in the case of morality187
semantic access13, 92, 152, 177–84, 198–200, 267, 271
and conceptual role semantics179
and disagreement198–200
as a matter of metaphysics rather than linguistic semantics177
as a matter of metasemantics177
Setiya, K.22 n. 11, 221 n. 8, 225 n. 12, 226 n. 14, 228 n. 21, 229 n. 25, 246 n. 51,
Shafer-Landau, R.6, 10 n. 19, 40 n., 51 n. 2, 52 n. 3, n. 5, n. 7, n. 8, 53 n. 9, 56 n. 17, 78 n. 68, 80 n. 73, 83 n., 97 n. 15, 102 n. 7, 103 n. 12, 109 n. 29, 128 n. 93, 135 n., 139 n. 10, 142 n. 23, 144 n., 153 n. 3, n. 5, 157 n. 13, 163, 165 n. 30, 188 n. 7, n. 8, n. 9, 192 n. 19, n. (p.294) 20, 193 n. 23, n. 24, 194 n. 28, 197 n. 34, 207 n. 57, 210 n. 63, n. 66, 215 n. 79, 244 n., 248 n. 52, n. 54, 250 n. 60, n. 61, 252 n. 71, 260 n. 93, 261 n. 98, n. 101, 263 n. 107, 265 n.
Simon, C. J.52 n. 5, 53 n. 9, 55 n. 14
Simple Moorean Argument117–19
Singer, P.192–3
Sinnott-Armstrong, W.120 n. 66, 153 n. 3, 157 n. 13, 163 n. 25, 188 n. 10, 191 n. 18
Skarsaune, K. O.162 n. 23, 171
Skepticism4, 5, 8 n. 15, 13, 43, 57–8, 75 n., 79, 119–21, 131, 152–67, 171, 189, 195, 204, 210, 218, 242–6, 265, 269 see also why-be-moral skepticism
Slors, M. V. P.54 n. 12
Smith, D.43 n. 53
Smith, M.30 n. 27, 75 n., 76 n. 63, 104 n. 15, 116 n. 55, 200 n. 43, 222 n., 234, 248 n. 54, 249 n. 56, 251 n. 64, 252, 252 n. 69, n. 70, 253, 253 n. 74, 254–6
Sobel, S.82 n. 77, 249 n. 57, 260 n. 96
Sorensen, R.90 n. 2
Sosa, D.30 n. 29
Subjectivism3, 5 n. 7, 26 n. 19, 30–2, 34 n., 81, 97, 101, 122, 131 n. 102, 188, 270 see also Caricaturized Subjectivism
supervenience
and Blackburn’s argument137, 142–50
general supervenience
characterized142
discussed148–50
and Hume’s Dictum147, 149
and Jackson’s argument137–40
modal status of specific supervenience146
and naturalism101 n. 2, 134, 138, 142
and ontological dependence102 n. 4
and ontological innocence141
and parsimony139–40
and particularism145 n. 30
and the purported identity of necessarily coextensive properties137–40
and Sheer Queerness150
specific supervenience
characterized142
explained and discussed144–8
strong individual supervenience136–7, 146
Stratton-Lake, P.6 n. 9
Street, S.151, 162 n. 23, 163–175, 197 n. 32
Streumer, B.138–140
Stroud, B.79 n. 71
Sturgeon, N. S.6, 26 n. 18, 37 n. 40, 46 n. 59, 51 n. 2, 52 n. 6, n. 8, 103 n. 111, 136 n. 3, 141 n. 18, 198 n. 36, 200 n. 43, 202 n., 206 n. 56
Suikkanen, J.38 n. 44
Sumner, L. W.41 n. 47, 132 n. 107
Svavarsdóttir, S.3 n. 3, 8 n. 15, 17 n. 1, 122 n. 73, 169 n., 170 n. 42, 250–2, 254 n. 76, 255 n. 82, n. 83, 257 n. 87
Svensson, F.223 n.
Swinburne, R.215 n. 79
Tännsjö, T.7, 153 n. 3
Tersman, F.186 n. 3, 188 n. 10, 193 n. 25, 197 n. 32, n. 33, 199 n. 38, n. 39, n. 40, n. 41, 200 n. 42, n. 43, 203 n. 52, 212 n. 69, 215 n. 79, 256 n. 85
Thagard, P. R.194 n. 27
thick concepts86, 145 n. 30
Thomson, J. J.52 n. 8, 189 n. 11
Timmons, M.38 n. 43, 40 n., 104, 104 n. 24, 152 n., 157 n. 13, 163 n. 23, n. 25, 168 n. 37, 199 n. 39
Tolhurst, W.189 n. 11
transcendental arguments54 n. 12, 79 n. 71
and indispensability arguments79 n. 71
Ullmann-Margalit, E.73 n. 55
Unger, P.192–3
Van Cleve, J.119 n. 62, n. 64
Van Fraassen, B. C.114, 189 n. 12
Van Inwagen, P.101 n. 3
Van Roojen, M.24 n. 16, 55 n. 15, 78 n. 68, 113 n. 48, 139 n. 10, 142 n. 21, 174 n. 51, n. 53
Velleman, J. D.29 n. 26, 82 n. 78, 126 n. 85, 201 n. 47, n. 48, 220 n. 5, 225 n. 12, 225 n. 14, 262 n. 103, 263 n. 106, 265 n. 266
Vogel, J.119 n. 62
Waldron, J.153 n. 3, 206 n. 54
Wallace, R. J.229 n. 22
Wedgwood, R.6, 10 n. 18, 13, 102 n. 8, 109 n. 29, 121 n. 70, 137 n. 4, 141 n. 19, n. 20, 142 n. 24, 148 n. 36, 162 n. 23, 163 n. 24, 166 n. 35, 170 n. 42, 172 n. 47, 178–84
Weirich, P.87 n.
West, C.112 n. 39, 116 n. 58, 143 n. 28
why-be-moral skepticism218, 242–7
compared to epistemological skepticism245
its rejection summarized247
Wielenberg, E.162 n. 23, 164 n. 28, 171 n. 44, 172 n. 49
Wiggins, D.30 n. 29, 52 n. 8, n. 9, 56 n. 17, 68 n. 48, 71 n. 52, 188 n. 7, 192 n. 20
Wikforss, Å.101 n. 2
Williams, B.14, 82 n. 76, 190 n. 13, 197 n. 33, 200 n. 45, 248 n. 53, 259–65
Wilson, J.147 n.
wishful thinking26 n. 19, 56, 89–90
(p.295) Wittgenstein, L.225
Wong, D. B.188 n. 7, 192 n. 19
Woodbridge, J.113 n. 46
Wright, C.41 n. 46, 51 n. 2, 52 n. 8, 54 n. 11, 120 n. 65, 163 n. 23, 209 n. 60, 212 n. 70
Yablo, S.110 n. 31, 112 n. 43, 113 n. 46
Yamada, M.143 n. 27
Yasenchuk, K.52 n. 8
Zangwill, N.128 n. 92
Zimmerman, D.52 n. 7, n. 8, 56 n. 17