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Emotion and Cognitive Life in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy$
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Martin Pickavé and Lisa Shapiro

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199579914

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199579914.001.0001

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Emotion and Cognition in Later Medieval Philosophy: The Case of Adam Wodeham

Emotion and Cognition in Later Medieval Philosophy: The Case of Adam Wodeham

Chapter:
(p.94) Emotion and Cognition in Later Medieval Philosophy: The Case of Adam Wodeham
Source:
Emotion and Cognitive Life in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy
Author(s):

Martin Pickavé

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199579914.003.0006

The idea that emotions are cognitive mental states is at the heart of many modern accounts of the emotions. This paper examines how medieval philosophers of the late thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries thought of the relationship between emotions, usually referred to as passions of the soul, and cognitions. Although medieval authors see a close relationship between emotions and those cognitions triggering them, they usually deny that emotions are simply kinds of cognition; strictly speaking, emotions are thought to be movements of the human appetites. However, one philosopher from the first half of the fourteenth century, Adam Wodeham, explicitly defends the view that emotions are cognitions. After examining Wodeham's arguments and the philosophical motivation behind his view, the paper turns to critical reactions to Wodeham's unique account.

Keywords:   Adam Wodeham, cognition, emotions, Gregory of Rimini, intentionality, passions, Thomas Aquinas, volition, William of Ockham, will

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