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America and the Law of Nations 1776-1939$
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Mark Weston Janis

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199579341

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199579341.001.0001

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Dodge, Worcester, Ladd, and Burritt: Christianity, Courts, and World Peace

Dodge, Worcester, Ladd, and Burritt: Christianity, Courts, and World Peace

Chapter:
(p.72) 4 Dodge, Worcester, Ladd, and Burritt: Christianity, Courts, and World Peace
Source:
America and the Law of Nations 1776-1939
Author(s):

Mark Weston Janis

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199579341.003.0004

This chapter shows how the international courts of today are the offspring of 19th-century American utopians, religious enthusiasts by and large untrained in the law. These early proponents of an international court were active between the War of 1812 and the American Civil War. This half century was the period when the particulars of what became the World Court took on concrete form and when the agitation for such a court became quite strong in America. The ideas and enthusiasm then generated for an international court and organization were thus already in place when, between 1865 and 1945, the concept of an international court and organization captured the imagination of those Americans who promoted and helped institute the three successive forms of the International Court in 1899, 1919, and 1945.

Keywords:   David Low Dodge, Noah Worcester, War of 1812, William Ladd, Elihu Burritt, international adjudication

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