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Roman Christianity and Roman StoicismA Comparative Study of Ancient Morality$
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Runar M. Thorsteinsson

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199578641

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199578641.001.0001

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Gaius Musonius Rufus

Gaius Musonius Rufus

Chapter:
(p.40) 3 Gaius Musonius Rufus
Source:
Roman Christianity and Roman Stoicism
Author(s):

Runar M. Thorsteinsson (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199578641.003.0004

Subsequent to a general introduction to the life of Musonius (ca. 25–100 CE), who was a towering figure in Roman Stoicism, an overview of his moral teaching was provided. Musonius was widely celebrated for his moral integrity. The sources on him reveal a teacher of philosophy who was particularly concerned with social issues. He considered the four traditional cardinal virtues more or less sufficient as the basis for ethics, but he could also define virtue as humanity and concern for the welfare of one's fellow human beings. This definition of virtue was in line with Musonius' heavy emphasis on concrete social matters, like questions concerning the family, the status of women, and the situation of the less fortunate in society.

Keywords:   Musonius Rufus, moral integrity, virtue, humanity, social issues, family, women

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